Innate Depravity

Innate Depravity - when I think of sports teams. When a...

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Professor McKenna Human Ethology 5/3/11 The New Litany of Innate Depravity Ashley Montagu observes original sin and the central theme of man and aggression in this article. One point that I found to be extremely interesting and captivating was when Montagu observed the idea of human cooperation. Exploring this concept he showed many of the benefits that came from this process. One quote that I found to accurately describe and portray these benefits was, “throughout the two million years of man’s evolution the highest premium has been placed on cooperation.” After thinking about this quote, and idea Montagu is trying to express, I explicitly see that this idea makes perfect sense. It is clear that humans learn from each other, and we learn from the mistakes of others. When working together we are able to accomplish much more work and when cooperating there are multiple benefits. Personally I can relate to this
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Unformatted text preview: when I think of sports teams. When a team works together the group as a whole sees the most benefits and has the most success versus if each individual refused to rely on help from anyone. Another aspect of the article that captivated my interest was that when humans first began hunting it was for belligerence not the hunger for food. I had never thought of this before, but found it compelling to see this viewpoint and it made a lot of sense. Montagu explains that, When the necessities of the hunting life encountered the basic primate instincts, then all were intensified. Conflicts became lethal, territorial arguments, minor wars The creature who had once killed only through circumstance now killed for a living. This is defined as the aggressive imperative. I found this transition very interesting and after reading better understood the correlations between hunting and aggression....
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This note was uploaded on 01/05/2012 for the course ANTH 10105 taught by Professor Mckenna during the Winter '11 term at Notre Dame.

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