Chapter 13 Lecture Slides Toddlers to Later Years

Chapter 13 Lecture Slides Toddlers to Later Years - Chapter...

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Chapter 13 Life Cycle Nutrition: Toddlers through the Later Years
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Early Childhood Two age categories during early childhood: Toddlers: 1-3 years old Preschoolers: 3-5 years old Growth slows significantly: Average weight gain in 2nd year: 3-5 pounds Average height gain: 3-5 inches
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Young Children and Nutrition Appetite decreases: monitor growth to determine if  child is eating enough Tend not to eat much at one sitting Need to eat small meals and nutrient-dense foods Toddlers are very active yet have small stomachs; need  1,000–1,600 calories daily Provide nutrient-dense meats, bean, fruits, vegetables,  milk, whole grains
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Choking Hazards for Toddlers Avoid  choking hazards: hot dogs nuts whole grapes hard candy popcorn raisins raw vegetables  chewing gum These items should not be given to children younger  than four, especially without supervision
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Macronutrient Issues and  Young Children Children 1–3 years of age: 500 mg/day of  calcium Children 4-5: 800 mg/day of  calcium Two 8 oz. glasses of milk provide about 600 mg Iron  deficiency is most common nutritional deficiency in children, can lead  to developmental delays Results from too much milk or other iron-poor foods » Provide lean meats, iron-fortified cereals » http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn/Resources/Nibbles/iron.pdf 
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Young children need to consume enough!  Vitamin D Vitamin D important to prevent rickets Ages 1-8 need 10 mcg (400 IU)* (*updated 2008) Breastfed babies more at risk for deficiency if mom does not consume enough Vitamin D herself! Young children need nutrient-dense beverages….such as? Caution:  too much milk can displace important nutrients such as  iron. USDA has a Special Milk Program: http://www.fns.usda.gov/cga/factsheets/SMP_Quick_Facts.htm 
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Fiber and Young Children Fiber Children ages 1-3 years need 19 g/day Children 4-8 years: 25 g/day Whole grains, fruits, and vegetables can meet needs Whole grain breads Whole grain cereals Other ideas?
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Food Jags “Picky eating” and “food jags” are common in small children. Parents should
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This note was uploaded on 01/05/2012 for the course HPEB 502 taught by Professor Montgomery during the Spring '09 term at South Carolina.

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Chapter 13 Lecture Slides Toddlers to Later Years - Chapter...

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