BUS-500 DB4

BUS-500 DB4 - DISCUSSION BOARD 4 Angry people are an...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
DISCUSSION BOARD 4 Angry people are an inherent part of some jobs (Gillen, 2008). In the social services field, I’ve encounter many conflicting situations with angry & difficult clients. It is important to realize that very angry people want an opportunity to vent their anger, and they want to be heard and acknowledged (Gillen, 2008). Conflict is defined as a process that begins when one party perceives that another party has negatively affected, or is about to negatively affect something that the first party cares about (Robbins & Judge, 2009, p. 485). The definition of conflict is broad (Robbins & Judge, 2009, p. 485). It describes that point in any ongoing activity when an interaction “cross-over” to become interparty conflict (Robbins & Judge, 2009, p. 485). I dealt with a conflicting situation with an angry client. The client was angry after being told that he didn’t qualify to receive Medicaid benefits. I thoroughly evaluated the client for all programs, and explain the reason why he didn’t qualified. The client was in disagreement, and refuse to take no for an answer. Most people tend to focus on Stage IV of the conflict process when they think of conflict situations. Stage IV is where conflict becomes visible. The conflict-intensity continuum is a way to visualize conflict behavior (Robbins & Judge, 2009, p. 491). At
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 4

BUS-500 DB4 - DISCUSSION BOARD 4 Angry people are an...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online