Chapter 17 Career Mgmt teacher resources

Chapter 17 Career Mgmt teacher resources - 17 CAREER...

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17 CAREER MANAGEMENT CHAPTER SCAN This chapter emphasizes the increasing responsibility that employees are taking for their own career management. It describes the four stages of career advancement and the typical characteristics for each stage. In addition, it provides an overview of Holland's six types of personalities and occupational choice, and describes the role of psychological contracts and mentors on career development, career paths, and career anchors. LEARNING OBJECTIVES After reading this chapter, you should be able to do the following: 1. Define career and career management. 2. Explain occupational and organizational choice decisions. 3. Describe the four stages of the career model. 4. Explain the psychological contract. 5. Describe how mentors help organizational newcomers. 6. Describe ways to manage conflicts between work and home. 7. Explain how career anchors help form a career identity. 83
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Chapter 17: Career Management KEY TERMS Chapter 17 introduces the following key terms: career career management realistic job preview (RJP) establishment advancement maintenance withdrawal psychological contract career path career ladder mentor dual-career partnership flexible work schedule eldercare career plateau bridge employment career anchors THE CHAPTER SUMMARIZED I. THINKING AHEAD: Brinker’s Mentoring Philosophy Attracts the Brightest and Best Talent II. CAREERS AS JOINT RESPONSIBILITIES A career is the pattern of work-related experiences that span the course of a person’s life. Career management is a lifelong process of learning about self, jobs, and organizations; setting personal career goals; developing strategies for achieving the goals, and revising the goals based on work and life experiences. With the onset of widespread reductions in force, employers are beginning to invest in programs that enable employees to be more self-sufficient. The responsibility for managing careers is shifting away from the organization and toward the individual. III. THE NEW CAREER As the environment demands leaner organizations, shifts occur in the design of careers. Employees can no longer depend on the promise of lifetime employment in one organization, and they must continually develop their job skills to meet the changing needs of organizations. A. Becoming Your Own Career Coach 84
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Chapter 17: Career Management To stay employable in this new career environment, it helps to view yourself as being in business for yourself. Keeping skills current and packaging them properly will increase your value to other employers. Success will depend on the ability to be flexible, team oriented, comfortable with change, and tolerant of ambiguity. It is important to be committed to lifelong learning in order to survive this paradigm shift. B. Emotional Intelligence and Career Success
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This note was uploaded on 01/06/2012 for the course BME 214614 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at SUNY Empire State.

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Chapter 17 Career Mgmt teacher resources - 17 CAREER...

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