Explaining the Total Degrees of Freedom for Six Sigma Practitioners

Explaining the Total Degrees of Freedom for Six Sigma Practitioners

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Explaining the Total Degrees of Freedom for Six Sigma Practitioners Tags: E. George Woodley | degrees of freedom statistics | Six Sigma practitioners | degrees of freedom | analysis of variance | Six Sigma | statistical analysis | Methodologies, Statistical Analysis, and Tools We, as statisticians, Six Sigma Belts and quality practitioners have utilized the term degrees of freedom as a part of our hypothesis testing, such as the t-test for comparison of two means and ANOVA (Analysis of Variance), as well as confidence intervals, to mention a few references. I can recall from the many classes I have taught from Six Sigma Green Belts to Six Sigma Master Black Belts inclusive, that students have had a bit of a problem grasping the whole idea of the degrees of freedom , especially when we describe the concept of the standard deviation: …the average distance of the data from the MEAN… 1 By now, Six Sigma practitioners should have a comfort level with concepts like the MEAN ; which is calculated by taking the sum of all the observations, and dividing by the number of observations ( n ). The total degrees of freedom are then represented as ( n-1 ). Defining Degrees of Freedom One method for describing the degrees of freedom , as per William Gosset, has been stated as, “The general idea: given that n pieces of data x 1 , x 2 , … x n , you use one ‘degree of freedom’ when you compute μ, leaving n-1 independent pieces of information.” 2 This was reflected in the approach summarized by one of my former professors. He stated that
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern