burns - Superficial Superficial Superficial...

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Superficial Superficial Superficial partial-thickness Superficial partial-thickness Deep partial-thickness Deep partial-thickness
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Very painful, dry, red burns which blanch with pressure. They usually take 3 to 7 days to heal without scarring. Also known as first-degree burns. The most common type of first-degree burn is sunburn. First-degree burns are limited to the epidermis, or upper layers of skin.
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Very painful burns sensitive to temperature change and air exposure. More commonly referred to as second-degree burns. Typically, they blister and are moist, red, weeping burns which blanch with pressure. They heal in 7 to 21 days. Scarring is usually confined to changes in skin pigment.
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Blistering or easily unroofed burns which are wet or waxy dry, and are painful to pressure. Their color may range from patchy, cheesy white to red, and they do not blanch with pressure. They take over 21 days to heal and scarring may be severe. It is sometimes difficult to differentiate these burns from full-thickness burns.
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Burns which cause the skin to be waxy white to a charred black and tend to be painless. Healing is very slow, if at all, and may require skin grafting. Severe scarring usually occurs.
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The skin, the largest organ of the body, consists of two layers-the epidermis and dermis. The depth or degree of burn depends on which layers of skin are damaged or destroyed. The epidermis is the outer layer that forms the protective covering. The thicker or inner layer of the dermis contains blood vessels, hair follicles, nerve endings, sweat and sebaceous glands. When the dermis is destroyed, so are the nerve endings that allow a person to feel pain, temperature, and tactile sensation.
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The most important function of the skin is to act as a barrier against infection. The skin prevents loss of body fluids, thus
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This note was uploaded on 01/06/2012 for the course STEP 1 taught by Professor Dr.aslam during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

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burns - Superficial Superficial Superficial...

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