Colonic bleeding embolization - DBaril

Colonic bleeding embolization - DBaril - Angiographic...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Angiographic embolization for the treatment of lower gastrointestinal bleeding Donald Baril Team IV Conference July 9, 2004
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Case report - W.H. 76 yo M with past medical history of BPH and melanoma and known diverticulosis Transferred from an outside hospital with lower gastrointestinal bleeding Transfused 5U PRBC at outside hospital (Hct 26 35) Outside hospital colonoscopy - diverticulosis with no active bleeding; EGD - no pathology
Image of page 2
Case report - W.H. Transferred to SICU Hemodynamically stable Continued to have hematochezia with dropping hematocrit (35 22) and was transfused an additional 9U PRBC over the following 3 days Bleeding scan localized source to the cecum and ascending colon Proceeded to angiography and embolization
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
SMA angiogram
Image of page 4
Selective SMA and ileocolic angiogram
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Selective ileocolic angiogram with coil deployment
Image of page 6
Post-embolization angiogram
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Case report - W.H. Tolerated regular diet Hematocrit remained stable Discharged home on post-procedure day # 3
Image of page 8
Lower gastrointestinal bleeding Annual incidence of 25 per 100,000 patients Gastrointestinal bleeding accounts for 2% of all hospital admissions Lower gastrointestinal bleeds account for approximately ¼ of all patients admitted with gastrointestinal bleeding Incidence of bleeding increases with age Bleeding spontaneously ceases in 80% of cases Mortality rates of 10-15%
Image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Etiology of lower gastrointestinal bleeding Adolescents and children Inflammatory bowel disease, polyps, Meckel’s diverticulum Adults < 60 Diverticular disease, neoplasms, inflammatory bowel disease Adults > 60 Diverticular disease, angiodysplasia, neoplasms
Image of page 10
Etiology of lower gastrointestinal bleeding
Image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern