Basic Oscillo Manual - Physics 211L/Phys205L BASIC OSCILLOSCOPE OPERATIONS Object Introduction to the theory controls and operation of a

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Physics 211L/Phys205L BASIC OSCILLOSCOPE OPERATIONS Object: Introduction to the theory, controls and operation of a general-purpose oscilloscope. Equipment: Oscilloscope, function generator, frequency counter, transformer/rectifier-unit, phase shifter, a set of connecting wires which includes BNC-BNC cables, banana-banana cables and BNC-banana adapters. Theory: The cathode-ray oscilloscope (CRO) is one of the most common and most important laboratory instruments. It provides, basically, a calibrated two-dimensional display in which the vertical and horizontal deflections are proportional to the applied voltages. Under most common operating conditions, the horizontal deflection is proportional to time, and therefore the voltage against time is displayed on the screen of the oscilloscope. 1
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In a Cathode Ray Tube (Fig. 1), an electron beam emitted by the heated cathode (C) is accelerated by the anode (A) and then travels between two pairs of plates to hit a phosphor screen generating a luminous spot. Two voltages (V x and V y ) applied to these plates create electric fields between the plates and cause the beam (and spot) to deflect. The deflection (D) of the spot, on the screen, is proportional to the applied voltage. If the two voltages vary, the spot moves generating a curve on the screen, which is a plot of V y vs. V x . On the other hand, if an internally generated voltage, which increases linearly with time, is applied to the horizontal deflection plates, the x-deflection becomes proportional to time. If the voltage to be examined is connected to the vertical deflection plates, the scope display becomes a V y vs. t curve. This is the most common configuration for oscilloscopes. Any phenomena that can be converted into a voltage can be measured with an oscilloscope, which provides two basic pieces of information, “how much” and “how long”. The amplitude (“how much”) is plotted on the vertical (Y-axis) and the time (“how long”) is plotted on the horizontal (X-axis). Notes concerning the detailed features of your oscilloscope and an explanation for the most important controls will be given to you in the laboratory session. Procedure:
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This note was uploaded on 01/06/2012 for the course PHYS 205L taught by Professor Antar,ghassan during the Spring '11 term at American University of Beirut.

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Basic Oscillo Manual - Physics 211L/Phys205L BASIC OSCILLOSCOPE OPERATIONS Object Introduction to the theory controls and operation of a

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