psy 329 paper

psy 329 paper - Mood Effects 1 Running Head MOOD EFFECTS...

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Mood Effects 1 Running Head: MOOD EFFECTS Mood Effects: Global and Local Scene Production Hannah Bauss California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo
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Mood Effects 2 Abstract There have been many studies that have examined the effect that mood has on global and local processing of information and scene perception. In this study, we tested whether mood can affect scene production as well as scene perception. In this experiment, we induced relaxation and then asked the participants to produce a scene on a blank piece of paper within three minutes. The drawings were then blindly coded and evaluated by multiple evaluators to determine the detail and creativity or each picture as well as if there was a more global or local concentration in the picture. We obtained statistically significant results that those who were relaxed created more global images than non-relaxed participants. At this time, we have no significant data as to whether relaxation affects creativity or the amount of detail put into a drawing. This study is important because it can help us start to understand the effects mood can have on people’s performance in the realms of work, education, and everyday life.
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Mood Effects 3 Mood Effects: Global and Local Scene Production There have been many studies and a great amount of research done on global vs. local processing and mood. Some research has also examined the relationship between the two and how they affect each other. But there have not been any studies that have looked to see if scene perception translates into scene production. Mood can be defined as a relatively long-lasting, affective or emotional state and are usually positive or negative. Moods can last for several hours or a few days, unlike emotions which last for minutes only or states which last for months or years. It has been proved that people can self-regulate and make judgments about their moods (Mayer, Salovey, Gomberg- Kaufman, & Blainey, 1991). Nolen-Hoeksema (1991) also revealed that there are certain gender differences in mood regulation; one being that women are more likely to suffer from depression. Differences have also been discovered in how men and women differ in dealing with stress or depression. Women are more likely to use food (Forster & Jeffery, 1986; Grunberg & Straub, 1992) or seek social interaction (Amirkan, 1990; Flaherty & Richman, 1989; Houtman, 1990) whereas men are more likely to turn to drugs and alcohol (Richman & Flaherty, 1986; Berkowitz & Perkins, 1987; Engs & Hanson, 1990) to cope with stress or depression. Thayer, Newman, and McClain (1994) showed that there is major overlap between methods used to change a bad mood and methods to reduce tension or raise energy, with exercise, music, and social interaction being some of the successful, in terms of self-rating. Bower (1981) and Clore (1975) discovered that some judgments people make are affected/reflect the mood of the person at the time of the judgment. Schwartz and Clore also discuss a kind of “affect-as-information approach” where
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psy 329 paper - Mood Effects 1 Running Head MOOD EFFECTS...

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