Annotated Bibliography

Annotated Bibliography - CRISIS COMMUNICATION 1 CRISIS...

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CRISIS COMMUNICATION 1 CRISIS COMMUNICATION BUSI_550_D02 Professor Needham April 9, 2011
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CRISIS COMMUNICATION 1 Abstract Crisis is defined as an unstable or crucial time or state of affairs in which a decisive change is impending. United States economic crisis, death of a close relative, and financial crisis are few examples of a crisis. Organizations also face crisis. Crisis can be very challenging for organizations that are effected by this. Crisis can be damaging for a company’s reputation. Crisis demands for immediate attention, and companies must take the necessary protocol of the benefit of the company as well as those affected by a crisis. Organizations must develop a strategic plan and have effective communication channels to avoid all levels of crisis. The goal of crisis communication is for organizations to maintain a good reputation.
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CRISIS COMMUNICATION NyBlom, S. E. (2003). Understanding Crisis Management. Professional Safety , 48(3), 18. Crisis is defined as any incident that can focus negative attention on a company and have an adverse effect on its overall financial condition, its relationships with its audiences or its reputation in the marketplace. The most critical question to start the process is “What constitutes a crisis?” The answer will determine the nature and scope of a crisis management plan. Boin, A. (2004). Lessons from Crisis Research. International Studies Review , 6(1), 165- 174. A crisis occurs when the institutional structure of a social system experiences a relatively strong decline in legitimacy as its central service functions are impaired or suffer from overload. Within a relatively short time, political and societal trust will diminish regarding how well the social system is operating. Cox, J. and Hawthorne W. (1999). Crisis Management: Are you really prepared? Risk Management/Insurance Div. Newsletter. The importance of proper planning is demonstrated after a crisis has occurred. Many organizations fail following a significant crisis due to poor planning; others survive because of their plans and their response. For example, Johnson & Johnson had a significant crisis (drug tampering scare) in the early 1980s. Bob Daretta, J&J’s chief financial officer, said, “Frankly, your reputation is the most 2
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CRISIS COMMUNICATION important asset you own.” He made this comment after the firm spent $117 million to recall, test and destroy existing stock. Through its handling of this Reid, J (2000). Crisis Management: Planning and Media Relations for the Design and Construction Industry. Protecting company reputation and credibility during a crisis is the company’s responsibility, one that must be taken seriously and addressed at the onset of the crisis. Failing to communicate the company’s story or how the company is responding will cause the public to believe what they learn from the media and competitors. Boin, A. (2009). The New World of Crises and Crisis Management: Implications for
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This note was uploaded on 01/07/2012 for the course BUS 550 taught by Professor Needham during the Spring '11 term at Liberty.

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Annotated Bibliography - CRISIS COMMUNICATION 1 CRISIS...

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