Crisis Communication Research Paper

Crisis Communication Research Paper - Running Head: CRISIS...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Running Head: CRISIS COMMUNICATION CRISIS COMMUNICATION BUSI_550_D02 Professor Needham May 11, 2011
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
CRISIS COMMUNICATION 1 Abstract Crisis is defined as an unstable or crucial time or state of affairs in which a decisive change is impending. United States economic crisis, death of a close relative, and financial crisis are few examples of a crisis. Organizations also face crisis. Crisis can be very challenging for organizations that are effected by this. Crisis can be damaging for a company’s reputation. Crisis demands for immediate attention, and companies must take the necessary protocol of the benefit of the company as well as those affected by a crisis. Organizations must develop a strategic plan and have effective communication channels to avoid all levels of crisis. The goal of crisis communication is for organizations to maintain a good reputation.
Background image of page 2
CRISIS COMMUNICATION 2 Introduction The shape and dynamics of crisis is changing (Boin, 2009). Crises have different causes, play out differently, draw different reactions, and affect societies in different ways (Boin, 2009). A crisis is a “time of ambiguity, uncertainty, and struggle to regain control” (Seon-Kyoung, Gower, Cho, 2011). What is a crisis? Webster dictionary defined a crisis as an unstable or crucial time or state of affairs in which a decisive change is impending; especially one with the distinct possibility of a highly undesirable outcome. The word crisis originates from the Greek word “krisis”, which means judgment, choice or decision (Paraskevas, 2006). A crisis is something everyone can relate to (Argenti, 2009, p. 257). The death of a close relative, the theft of one’s car, or even a broken heart ---- all can become crises in one’s personal life (Argenti, 2009, p. 257). Organizations too are also faced with crisis. Organizations must take precautious steps in avoiding a crisis. Selling a simple cup of coffee, for instance, already requires much more knowledge than how to brew and serve it (Kanter, 2010). “Where was the coffee grown, under what labor conditions, and with what pesticides? Is the cup made from recycled paper, and how many trees were cut down and how much water was used to manufacture it? Does the plastic lid leak toxins, and does it snap shut well enough to prevent burns from spills?” Well-Known Business Crisis Crisis management as a formal organizational discipline had recently been accelerated in the USA by the Tylenol crisis of 1982; and the new concept of
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
CRISIS COMMUNICATION 3 environmental risk communication was in its infancy (Jacques, 2011). Johnson & Johnson Tylenol recall is held by many as “the golden standard” of product-recalled crisis management. Tylenol drug tampering scare was indeed a significant crisis because it was a danger to people’s well-being. Johnson & Johnson’s handling of the crisis was characterized by a swift and coordinate response and a demonstration of concern for the public that only strengthened its reputation as “the caring company” (Argenti, 2009, p. 261).
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 16

Crisis Communication Research Paper - Running Head: CRISIS...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online