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The Occurrence of Prevailing Themes and Social Conflict in History and Disasters Erica Lee SOC 400 Professor D. Britton August 13, 2010 Abstract Japan posed as a threat to the world. To put an end to the further massacring of World War II, the United States had no other alternative but to resort to the omnipotent and destructive atomic nuclear weapons. Within a period of three days, hundreds of thousands of Japanese civilians were obliterated and tens of thousands of buildings were destroyed. The first bomb, “Little Boy” was unleashed on August 6, 1945 in the town of Hiroshima and soon after “Fat Man” on August, 9 1945 dropped over the town of Nagasaki. It was a horrific disaster that happened in a blink of an eye but, for the survivors it was a significant and a dire moment that would impact and traumatize them for the rest of their lives. Japan was left in nothing but rubbles, with thousands dead and
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an additional tens of thousands seeking for medical help; a rich culture was collapsed in a matter of minutes. And yet, with a short period of sixty years, Japan has rebuilt its country and established a reputation as one of the most powerful and financially prosperous countries in the world today. This paper will explore the reoccurring themes and issues in the “sociology of disaster in relations to the ideologies of disaster and the social aspects in relation to the destruction in Japan. Also, it will provide insightful personal accounts from the survivors and what the victims had to deal with in terms of separation of families, diseases and abnormalities caused by the radiation, and the disruption in the social structure of the nation. Lastly, I will compare the disaster with that of Hurricane Katrina and the prevailing issue of racism that I found to be prevalent in both disasters. Opposed to other popular disasters which were hit by a natural phenomenon related to weather, the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombing was a disaster created by the fear in loss of power and men’s insatiable hunger of greed; consequently, it was man-made disaster. There is a popular yet clichéd saying that “history repeats itself”. I believe this applies to social disasters as well! Main Body Toward the end of the deadliest and most brutal wars in history, the United States quickly finalized the long-lasting World War II by bombing the two cities of Japan, Hiroshima and Nagasaki; this marked the era of the atomic age. The bombings were a result of the stubborn Japanese government and its refusal to surrender despite the final warnings, the Potsdam Declaration issued by the United States and its Allies. However, later it was exposed that a confusion regarding a statement made by the
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Japanese government accounted for the demise of Japan. According to Johnson (1980), “Writers on international politics regularly point to failures in translation or to misunderstandings derived from the language, as major contributing factors to international disputes involving Japan, even when Japanese spokesmen have been
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This note was uploaded on 01/09/2012 for the course SOC 400 taught by Professor Britton during the Spring '10 term at WPUNJ.

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paperr[1][1] - The Occurrence of Prevailing Themes and...

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