Hurricane Katrina

Hurricane Katrina - After the natural disaster Hurricane...

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After the natural disaster Hurricane Katrina ravaged New Orleans, residents of many different ethnicities, nationalities, and economic makeups were severely impacted by the implications of the storm. In order to understand why some people were affected more by the storm than others it is important to acknowledge and analyze the social vulnerability of the three major resident ethnicities prevalent in New Orleans; White, African-American, and Latino. In order for people to properly prepare for an incoming hurricane, they must be capable of accurately anticipating the risk involved. In New Orleans there was a large disparity between what races received efficient distribution of pre-storm information and warnings by the media and government. One of the major causes of the disparity is the residential and institutional segregation that has occurred in New Orleans due to practices and policies such as red lining performed by the FHA.
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This note was uploaded on 01/07/2012 for the course JUS 444 taught by Professor Kelley during the Spring '10 term at ASU.

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Hurricane Katrina - After the natural disaster Hurricane...

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