ch03_online_notes

ch03_online_notes - Ch.3 EarthMaterials Minerals andRocks

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Ch. 3  Earth Materials Minerals and Rocks Grotzinger, Jordan Press and Siever, 5th Ed. 2007 Adapted by Juan Lorenzo from Lecture Slides prepared by Peter Copeland • Bill Dupré  
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Concepts… Minerals Ionic and Covalent Bonds Mineral classes based on negative ions Mineral classification based on hardness Cleavage, Fracture, Habit
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Concepts continued Igneous Rocks  Basalt (extrusive) Granite (intrusive) Sedimentary Rocks Erosion=Weathering+transport Layering/bedding Compaction  cementation Metamorphic Rocks Regional Rock Cycle Micas and feldspars ----  clays Iron Minerals   ------  rust/oxidation
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Quartz
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Mineral A naturally occurring, solid, crystalline  substance(ordered atomic arrangement), generally  inorganic, with a definite chemical composition.
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Fig. 3.1 Calcite
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Rock A naturally-occurring consolidated  mixture of minerals or mineral-like  substances.
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Is cane sugar a mineral? 1. False 2. True
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When an atom loses or gains an electron to or from another atom, what remains is called an ion. Positively charged ions (loss of electron) are called cations. Negatively charged ions (gain of
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This note was uploaded on 01/08/2012 for the course GEOLOGY 1001 taught by Professor Danielkelley during the Spring '10 term at LSU.

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ch03_online_notes - Ch.3 EarthMaterials Minerals andRocks

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