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Week 4 Shoulder & Clavicles Intro to Processor QC 91

Week 4 Shoulder & Clavicles Intro to Processor QC...

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1 14.1 Shoulder Radiography Routine Non-Trauma: A-P with internal and external rotation of humerus Trauma or Dislocation Shoulder: A-P internal rotation, Lateral scapula or “Y” view, Apical Oblique,possible or Stryker Notch and P-A Axillary Shoulder Instability: Weighted internal and external rotation, Stryker Notch
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2 Shoulder Radiography To evaluate the glenohumeral joint, the scapula must be parallel to the film. Shoulder views can be taken with suspended respiration The Clavicle and A C joints will have the patient in a true A-P position with mid sagittal plane perpendicular to film.
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3 A-P and A-P with Scapula parallel to film. AP is used for clavicle and AC joint. Scapula should be parallel to film for shoulder joint.
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4 Shoulder Radiography A-C Joint view are taken with full inspiration to help open the joint space. A-C Joint views are taken weighted and non-weighted when looking for a separation. The weights must be 10 to 15 pounds and strapped around the wrists to avoid the use of the arm muscles.
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5 Shoulder Radiography A-C Joints views can also be taken to detect metabolic or drug induced bone loss. The view need not be taken with and without weights. The Clavicle can be taken A-P or P-A. The P-A view will have less magnification distortion but is more difficult to position.
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6 14.2 Shoulder A-P with Internal Rotation Measure: A-P at coracoid process Protection: Half Apron SID: 40” Bucky No Tube Angle Film: 10” x 8” I.D. toward spine Marker: anatomical plus “INT” or arrow pointing inward
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7 Shoulder A-P with Internal Rotation Patient stands facing tube. The patient is rotated 15 to 45 degrees until the scapula is parallel to the film. The patient internally rotates humerus until the epicondyles are perpendicular to the film.
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8 Shoulder A-P with Internal Rotation Horizontal CR: 1” below the coracoid process Vertical CR: coracoid process or through the glenohumeral joint Film centered to Horizontal CR Collimation: to include soft tissue around shoulder or slightly less than film size.
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9 Shoulder A-P with Internal Rotation Breathing Instructions: suspended respiration Make exposure and let patient breathe and relax. Some facilities will use a 12” x 10 cassette
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10 Shoulder A-P with Internal Rotation Film The glenohumeral joint should be open The lesser tubericle will be in profile medially. The humeral head and greater tubericle will be superimposed.
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11 14.3 Shoulder A-P with External Rotation Measure: A-P at coracoid process Protection: Half Apron SID: 40” Bucky No Tube Angle Film: 10” x 8” I.D. toward spine Marker: anatomical plus “EXT” or arrow pointing outward
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12 Shoulder A-P with External Rotation Patient stands facing tube.
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