PSY326 Week Four Assignment

PSY326 Week Four Assignment - CRITIQUING AN ARTICLE 1...

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CRITIQUING AN ARTICLE 1 Critiquing an Article Sirisha Nandini Jala PSY 326: Research Methods Angela Willis April 25 th , 2011
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CRITIQUING AN ARTICLE 2 The Critique The research study that is chosen is number four, a “Fathers’ Qualitative and Quantitative involvement: An Investigation of Attachment, Play, and Social Interactions”, by Kerry Kazura. This research study was mentioned in the Journal of Men’s Studies. This research study was chosen because it deals with the impact a father has on his children. It is wondered what Kazura had found out in this research. Kazura’s research problem is as follows: “the purpose of this study was to investigate father-child relationships by recording fathers' level of involvement and by examining the quality of this relationship through observations of father-child attachment behaviors, play interactions, and social interactions” (Kazura, 2000). The research hypothesis is concise and is limited to a narrow enough focus that it will not take a huge amount of resources to conduct the experiment. It is also non-directional, as it is open- ended. The experimenter wants to find out what is going on but is not saying what that will be. That is the reason for the experiment. Kazura shows that past research has shown that a working mother’s available time with the children is dropping due to outside the home employment; the father’s are not adjusting their time levels (Hardesty & Bokemeiser, 1989; Hochschild, 1989; Lamb, 1978; McBride & Darragh, 1995; Rexroat & Shehan, 1987; Shelton, 1990) (Kazura, 2000). If they are not increasing their childcare hours, is what they are doing any good or even affective? Kazura’s article next goes into the obstacles men may face when they try to increase their childcare time with the children. They are socialization, mothers as gatekeepers, and lack of role models. This is a basic primer for someone who does not know any of the obstacles that fathers may face.
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CRITIQUING AN ARTICLE 3 Kazura, K. (2000). Fathers' Qualitative and Quantitative Involvement: An Investigation of Attachment, Play, and Social Interactions. Journal of Men's Studies, 9, 1, 41 . Kazura has studied the qualitative and quantitative involvement of fathers’ in an investigation of attachment, play, and social interactions between fathers, mothers and their children. This research study used both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, thus it may be characterized as a mixed study. The researcher conducted in-depth interviews with twenty-seven fathers and twenty-seven mothers who all lived in Alabama. Of these 27 families, 24 of them were Caucasian families; two were African-American families, and one Eastern Indian family. It is not mentioned how long the East Indian family had been in the United States of America. This would have been an interesting cultural addition to the study, if they were not culturally assimilated into the prevalent culture of the United States. Of the children, fourteen children were male whereas thirteen children were female. Two of the children were adopted. Fourteen children were first born and
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