Scientific Paper Guidelines

Scientific Paper Guidelines - S c i e n t i f i c 
P a p...

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Unformatted text preview: S c i e n t i f i c 
P a p e r 
In f o r m a t i o n 
 
 General
Information:
 
 Paper
length:

4‐12
pages
double‐spaced
 
 Internal
citations:
At
least
5
 
 Font
(Section
Headers):

14
pt
Times
New
Roman
 
 Font
(Section
Bodies):

12
pt
Times
New
Roman
 
 Sections:
 Each
paper
must
contain
the
following
sections.

All
sections
must
be
written
in
 complete
sentences
and
paragraphs.

No
lists
or
bullets
allowed.

Note
the
template
 that
I
have
provided
goes
over
what
I
expect
to
see
in
each
of
these
sections.
 
 Title/Title
Page
 Abstract
 Introduction
 Materials
and
Methods
 Results
 Discussion
 References
 
 Grading:
 The
following
grades
will
be
assigned
to
a
paper
depending
upon
the
merit
of
the
 paper.

I
have
provided
broad
description
of
what
is
typically
found
in
each
type
of
 paper.

If
you
have
questions
or
concerns
over
the
grade
that
you
receive,
please
 schedule
an
appointment
with
me
outside
of
class
so
that
we
can
discuss
it
further.
 
 100
–
A
perfect
or
nearly
perfect
paper.

There
may
be
one
to
two
typos
or
possibly
 a
small
or
forgivable
error
in
the
entire
paper.

Strong
scientific
logic
throughout
the
 paper.

Excellent
discussions
and
data
analysis
as
well
as
statistical
analysis.

 Discussed
the
relevance
of
the
data
in
regards
to
the
null
and
alternate
hypotheses.
 
 95
–
An
excellent
paper
that
has
a
few
to
several
typos
or
possibly
an
erroneous
 statement
here
or
there.

There
is
strong
scientific
logic
throughout
accompanied
by
 excellent
discussion
and
data
analysis
with
some
statistical
analysis.

There
may
be
 some
problems
with
a
few
of
the
internal
citations.
Discussed
the
relevance
of
the
 data
in
regards
to
the
null
and
alternate
hypotheses.
 
 
 85
–
Grammatical
or
citation
errors
may
be
fairly
prevalent.

Scientific
 understanding
of
the
experiments
is
relatively
sound,
but
there
may
be
some
minor
 or
major
discords
in
a
few
of
the
sections
of
the
paper.

Conclusions
may
be
slightly
 weak,
with
no
real
discussion
about
the
results
and
their
relevance
to
the
null
and
 alternate
hypotheses.

Improper
use
of
jargon
may
also
be
prevalent,
and
there
may
 be
little
or
no
statistical
analysis.
 
 75
–
Multiple
sections
of
the
paper
are
done
incorrectly.

Data
analysis
is
minimal,
 and
erroneous
to
some
degree.

The
student
appears
to
have
the
jest
of
what
the
 experiment
was
about,
but
spends
little
time
discussing
the
scientific
ramifications
 of
the
data
obtained.

Sections
are
short
and
do
not
elaborate
or
analyze
the
 statistical
relevance
of
the
experiments.

Hypotheses
are
absent
or
not
spoken
of
 enough.

Improper
citations
or
no
citations
at
all.
 
 65

‐

Student
does
not
follow
the
format
set
forth
at
the
beginning
of
this
 handout.

Despite
the
data
presented
in
the
paper,
failure
to
follow
the
template
 that
I
have
provided
will
immediately
result
in
this
grade.
 
 Student
uses
graphs
and
charts
to
“fill”
space
so
that
they
don’t
have
to
write
as
 much.

Each
section
is
typically
one
to
five
sentences
long
with
no
real
clear
 demonstrationthat
the
student
understood
what
was
going
on.

Other
infractions
 that
will
warrant
this
grade
are
papers
that
are
written
over
something
that
has
 nothing
to
do
with
the
experiments
performed,
or
an
alternate
experiment
that
 covers
the
subject
matter,
but
that
we
never
performed
in
lab.
 
 Getting
started:
 Your
scientific
paper
will
be
written
over
the
experiments
that
you
performed
in
the
 enzyme
lab
this
semester.

While
you
obviously
won’t
be
able
to
write
your
paper
 over
the
experiments
themselves,
you
will
be
able
to
write
the
introduction,
which
is
 primarily
background
information.

If
you
are
having
trouble
deciding
where
to
 start,
then
schedule
an
appointment
with
me
so
that
we
can
discuss
the
topic
and
 clarify
any
troublesome
areas.

Please
do
not
schedule
your
appointment
to
 discuss
the
content
of
your
paper
on
the
day
before
the
paper
is
due.
 
 Help
with
writing:
 I
will
happily
give
feedback
to
those
who
have
their
papers
written
well
in
advance
 of
the
due
date.

There
is
no
limit
to
the
times
you
submit
your
paper
to
me
to
 receive
feedback.

However,
there
are
a
few
minor
rules
that
you
must
follow
for
me
 to
give
you
feedback.
 
 1.

Have
something
written.

I
don’t
care
if
it
is
an
outline
or
a
full
draft;
please
 show
me
that
you
have
made
an
effort
to
prepare
for
our
meeting.

If
you
come
with
 a
blank
sheet
of
paper,
and
it
is
clear
that
you
have
not
put
any
effort
into
your
 preparations,
then
it
is
not
fair
for
me
to
put
effort
into
helping
you.

Please
make
 sure
that
the
draft
that
you
turn
in
 
 2.

To
receive
feedback
you
must
meet
with
me
for
office
hours.

I
have
tried
to
 give
feedback
through
email
in
the
past,
as
it
is
much
easier
to
respond
and
get
the
 information
back
to
the
student.

However,
what
I
have
found
is
that
this
method
of
 communication
can
sometimes
disrupt
the
clarity
of
my
comments
on
the
 document.

As
a
result
I
have
decided
to
only
give
feedback
by
meeting
with
the
 student.

By
doing
this
I
can
dedicate
the
time
to
discussing
my
comments
on
the
 paper
with
you,
and
I
can
answer
any
additional
questions
that
you
have.
 
 3.

Provide
me
with
your
references.

By
doing
this
I
can
suggest
additional
 references
or
let
you
know
if
you
need
to
lose
one
or
more
of
yours.

This
way
I
can
 also
answer
questions
that
you
may
have
on
how
to
cite
these
references.
 
 Additionally,
the
CCCCD
writing
center
is
available
to
assist
you
with
the
paper
 should
you
need
it.

They
have
the
tendency
to
fill
up
rather
quickly,
so
please
 be
sure
to
schedule
an
appointment
sooner
rather
than
later.
 
 Example
paper:


 I
have
provided
you
with
an
example
paper
that
was
written
by
one
of
my
previous
 students.

In
this
paper
I
have
written
small
blurbs
at
the
end
that
highlight
some
of
 the
things
that
the
student
did
exceptionally
well.

I
am
aware
that
this
paper
is
 written
over
Mealworms,
which
you
will
NOT
be
the
topic
of
your
paper.

I
have
 done
this
to
decrease
the
temptation
to
plagiarize
the
work
provided.
 
 References
(The
Wikipedia
Conundrum):


 I
know
that
many
teachers
discourage
the
use
of
Wikipedia.

The
reason
for
this
is
 that
Wikipedia
may
not
always
be
accurate
in
regards
to
the
facts
that
it
attempts
to
 portray.

Remember
that
fans
of
a
subject
as
much
as
experts
of
that
same
subject
 can
submit
information
about
it.

Additionally,
the
world
is
composed
of
nearly
7
 billion
people.

The
staff
of
Wikipedia
is
so
small
that
it
is
impossible
for
them
to
 monitor
every
submission
to
the
site
on
a
daily,
and
occasionally
weekly
basis.

As
a
 result,
some
erroneous
information
may
be
allowed
to
remain
on
the
site
for
a
 longer
duration
of
time
before
being
taken
down.
 What
you
can
do
to
combat
erroneous
information:

Follow
the
references.

At
 the
end
of
most
statements
in
Wikipedia
you
will
find
a
minute
number
like
this[1].

 If
you
click
it,
it
will
take
you
the
end
of
the
article
and
will
provide
you
with
a
link
 or
a
source
from
which
the
information
was
obtained.

Follow
this
link
to
determine
 its
legitimacy.

Anything
ending
in
.edu
or
.gov
is
definitely
okay,
but
beware
of
.com,
 .net
or
.org,
as
these
may
require
extra
investigation
to
determine
if
they
are
or
are
 not
valid.
 
 Citing
Your
Citations:


 So
you
have
your
citations,
but
you
now
need
to
cite
them
internally.

This
doesn’t
 just
mean
that
you
list
them
at
the
very
end
of
your
paper.

Instead,
you
must
also
be
 sure
to
cite
a
reference
after
any
and
all
sentences
that
contain
information
obtained
 from
that
particular
reference.

Provided
below
is
an
excellent
program
that
will
 help
you
cite
your
references
at
both
the
end
of
the
paper
as
well
as
at
the
end
of
 sentences.
 http://www.calvin.edu/library/knightcite/
 Plagiarism:
 I
would
rather
you
turn
in
an
uncompleted
paper
that
is
your
work
than
a
 completed
one
that
is
plagiarized.

Plagiarism
is
defined
as
the
submission
of
a
piece
 of
work
that
is
not
original
without
providing
citation
as
to
its
source.

This
means
 that
you
are
not
allowed
to
copy
and
paste
from
a
former
student’s
paper,
nor
are
 you
allowed
to
copy
and
paste
from
a
website.

Should
you
provide
information
that
 you
acquired
by
reading
a
book,
a
journal
article,
or
a
website,
you
must
provide
the
 source
material.

Do
not
“lift”
your
introduction
from
websites
that
you
encounter
 either.

I
have
in
the
past
reported
students
to
the
dean
of
academic
life,
and
given
 them
no
grade
for
their
scientific
paper
for
violating
the
Collin
Student
Handbook
 regarding
plagiarism.

If
you
are
unsure
as
to
whether
or
not
what
you
are
doing
is
 plagiarism,
then
either
ask
me,
or,
in
the
event
that
you
cannot
contact
me,
simply
 remove
that
information
from
your
paper.

Better
safe
than
sorry.
 ...
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