Chap6_Sec4 - 6 APPLICATIONS OF INTEGRATION APPLICATIONS APPLICATIONS OF INTEGRATION 6.4 Work In this section we will learn about Applying

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APPLICATIONS OF INTEGRATION APPLICATIONS OF INTEGRATION 6
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6.4 Work APPLICATIONS OF INTEGRATION In this section, we will learn about: Applying integration to calculate the amount of work done in performing a certain physical task.
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The term ‘work’ is used in everyday language to mean the total amount of effort required to perform a task. WORK
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In physics, it has a technical meaning that depends on the idea of a ‘force.’ Intuitively, you can think of a force as describing a push or pull on an object. Some examples are: the horizontal push of a book across a table or the downward pull of the earth’s gravity on a ball. WORK
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In general, if an object moves along a straight line with position function s ( t ), then: The force F on the object (in the same direction) is defined by Newton’s Second Law of Motion as the product of its mass m and its acceleration. 2 2 d s F m dt = Defn. 1 / Eqn. 1 FORCE
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In the SI metric system, the mass is measured in kilograms (kg), the displacement in meters (m), the time in seconds (s), and the force in newtons (N = kg m/s 2 ). Thus, a force of 1 N acting on a mass of 1 kg produces an acceleration of 1 m/s 2 . FORCE
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In the US Customary system, the fundamental unit is chosen to be the unit of force, which is the pound. FORCE
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In the case of constant acceleration: The force F is also constant and the work done is defined to be the product of the force F and the distance that the object moves: W = Fd (work = force x distance) Defn. 2 / Eqn. 2 WORK
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If F is measured in newtons and d in meters, then the unit for W is a newton-meter called joule (J). If F is measured in pounds and d in feet, then the unit for W is a foot-pound (ft-lb), which is about 1.36 J. WORK
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book off the floor to put it on a desk that is 0.7 m high?
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This note was uploaded on 01/06/2012 for the course MATH 2414.S01 taught by Professor Alans.grave during the Fall '11 term at Collins.

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Chap6_Sec4 - 6 APPLICATIONS OF INTEGRATION APPLICATIONS APPLICATIONS OF INTEGRATION 6.4 Work In this section we will learn about Applying

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