CH05 - THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION FROM ELITE PROTEST TO...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION: FROM ELITE PROTEST TO POPULAR REVOLT, 1763-1783 America: Past and Present Chapter 5 Structure of Colonial Society n 1760s an optimistic post-war period – striking ethnic and racial diversity – 60% of population under 21 years old – high level of post-war prosperity – wealth unevenly distributed n Americans proud to be part of Europe’s most thriving, prosperous empire Breakdown of Political Trust n 1760--George III ascended throne n Suspicions on both sides of the Atlantic that Crown wished to enlarge its powers n Conflict over Parliamentary sovereignty English officials assumed that Parliament must have ultimate authority colonists tried to reserve internal colonial authority for their own legislatures
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
No Taxation Without Representation: the American Perspective n Colonists assume their legislatures equal in some ways to Parliament n Americans not represented at all in Parliament n British officials espoused “virtual representation” n Colonists insist only colonial assemblies could tax Americans Ideas About Power and Virtue n John Locke, "Commonwealthmen" inform colonial political thought n All governments believed susceptible to corruption into “tyranny” “tyranny” understood as any attempt to encroach upon the people's liberty n “Virtuous” citizens, alert to rights and determined to live free, resist tyranny Eroding the Bonds of Empire n Large, expensive army left in America at the end of the Seven Years’ War n Colonists doubted the army’s value n Pontiac’s War – exposed the British army ’s weakness – revealed the desperate situation of Native Americans after withdrawal of French n Colonists determined to settle trans- Appalachian West
Background image of page 2
Paying off the National Debt n First minister George Grenville attempts to reduce England’s war debt n Revenue Act of 1764 (the Sugar Act) n Merchants and gentry protest, most colonists ignore Colonial Products and Trade Popular Protest n 1765--Stamp Act requires that colonists purchase stamp to validate documents
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/06/2012 for the course HIST 1301 taught by Professor Sarabostelmann during the Spring '11 term at Collins.

Page1 / 12

CH05 - THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION FROM ELITE PROTEST TO...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online