Presidency

Presidency - 1 The Presidency Presidential Qualifications...

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Unformatted text preview: 1 The Presidency Presidential Qualifications and Terms of Office ¡ Article II, Section 1, of the Constitution sets forth the qualifications to be president. Must be a natural-born citizen ¡ At least 35 years of age ¡ Resident of the U.S. for at least 14 years ¡ Serves a four-year term with eligibility for reelection ¢ First president, Washington, sought reelection once. Set tradition as such. ¢ Franklin D. Roosevelt elected four times. ¢ Twenty-Second Amendment (ratified in 1951) limits presidents to two four-year terms. 2 The Process of Becoming President ¡ Nomination of one of the two major parties ¡ Majority of the votes cast in the Electoral College ¢ The electors are decided in most states on a winner-take- all system, with the candidate who receives the plurality of votes winning. Thus, it is possible for a candidate to lose the popular vote but still win election as president, as was the case in 2000. ¡ If no candidate receives a majority of the electoral votes, the House will elect the president by voting state by state for a candidate. Impeachment ¢ Article I, Section 2, gives the House the sole power of impeachment. If a majority of the members of the House vote to impeach an officer of the United States, the Senate will conduct a trial. If two-thirds of the Senators vote for conviction the officer is removed from office. ¢ The concept of impeachment is important because without this power there would be little that could be done to control criminal behavior by a top leader. On the other hand, this power could be abused and lead to politically motivated impeachments. ¢ The power delegated to the House of Representatives in the Constitution to charge the president, vice president, or other “civil officers” including federal judges, with “treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.” ¢ First step in the constitutional process of removing government officials from office Abuses of Executive Power and Impeachment ¢ Eight presidents have died in office, but there is another way to go out!...Impeachment ¢ Begins in the House (impeach = accuse) A simple majority vote needed to impeach ¢ Then it goes to the Senate for a trial. 2/3 vote needed for conviction ¢ Johnson: 11 articles; Nixon: 3 articles (abuse of power, obstruction of justice, no response to a committee’s subpoenas; Clinton: 4 articles, but only 2 accepted (perjury and obstruction of justice) 221-212 vote for impeachment ¢ Clinton was acquitted in Feb. 1999 3 Rules of Succession ¡ 8 presidents have died in office....
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This note was uploaded on 01/06/2012 for the course GOVT 2302 taught by Professor Mackharvey during the Fall '11 term at Collins.

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Presidency - 1 The Presidency Presidential Qualifications...

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