chapter9 - Childhood and Adolescence Voyages in Development...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development, Second Edition, Spencer A. Rathus Chapter 9 Chapter 9 Early Childhood: Cognitive Development
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development, Second Edition, Spencer A. Rathus Chapter 9 A preschooler’s having imaginary playmates is a sign of loneliness or psychological problems. Two-year-olds tend to assume that their parents are aware of everything that is happening to them, even when their parents are not present. Early Childhood: Cognitive Development Truth or Fiction?
Image of page 2
Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development, Second Edition, Spencer A. Rathus Chapter 9 “Because Mommy wants me to” may be a perfectly good explanation – for a 3-year-old. One and 2-year olds are too young to remember the past. Early Childhood: Cognitive Development Truth or Fiction?
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development, Second Edition, Spencer A. Rathus Chapter 9 Children’s levels of intelligence – not just their knowledge – are influenced by early learning experiences. A highly academic preschool education provides children with advantages in school later on. Early Childhood: Cognitive Development Truth or Fiction?
Image of page 4
Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development, Second Edition, Spencer A. Rathus Chapter 9 During her third year, a girl explained that she and her mother had finished singing a song by saying, “We singed it all up.” Three-year-olds usually say “Daddy goed away” instead of “Daddy went away” because they do understand the rules of grammar. Early Childhood: Cognitive Development Truth or Fiction?
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development, Second Edition, Spencer A. Rathus Chapter 9 Jean Piaget’s Preoperational Stage
Image of page 6
Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development, Second Edition, Spencer A. Rathus Chapter 9 Symbolic thought and play Pretend play 12-13 months – familiar activities; i.e. feed themselves 15-20 months – focus on others; i.e. feed doll 30 months – others take active role; i.e. doll feeds itself Imaginary Friends More common among first-born and only children How Do Children in the Preoperational Stage Think and Behave?
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development, Second Edition, Spencer A. Rathus Chapter 9 Lack of logical operations No flexible or reversible mental operations Egocentrism Only view the world through their own perspective Three-mountain test How Do We Characterize the Logic of the Preoperational Child?
Image of page 8
Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development, Second Edition, Spencer A. Rathus Chapter 9 Figure 9.1 The Three-Mountains Test
Image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development, Second Edition, Spencer A. Rathus Chapter 9 Causality Influenced by egocentrism Caused by will Precausal thinking Transductive reasoning Animism Artificialism Confusion between mental and physical phenomena Believe their thoughts reflect external reality Believe dreams are true How Do We Characterize the Logic of the Preoperational Child?
Image of page 10
Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development, Second Edition, Spencer A. Rathus
Image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern