chapter15 - Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in...

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Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development, Second Edition, Spencer A. Rathus Chapter 15 Chapter 15 Adolescence: Cognitive Development
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Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development, Second Edition, Spencer A. Rathus Chapter 15 Adolescence: Cognitive Development Truth or Fiction? Many adolescents see themselves as being on stage. It is normal for male adolescents to think of themselves as action heroes and act as if they’re made of steel.
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Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development, Second Edition, Spencer A. Rathus Chapter 15 Adolescent boys outperform adolescent girls in mathematics. Most adolescents make moral decisions based on their own ethical principles and may choose to disobey the laws of the land if they conflict with their principles. Adolescence: Cognitive Development Truth or Fiction?
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Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development, Second Edition, Spencer A. Rathus Chapter 15 The transition from elementary school is more difficult for boys than girls. Adolescents who work after school obtain lower grades. Adolescence: Cognitive Development Truth or Fiction?
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Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development, Second Edition, Spencer A. Rathus Chapter 15 The Adolescent in Thought My, My, How “Formal”
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Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in Development, Second Edition, Spencer A. Rathus Chapter 15 Highest level of Piaget’s theory Major achievements Classification Logical thought and deductive reasoning Ability to hypothesize Can think about abstract ideas Hypothetical thinking Can project beyond immediate experience Involved in lengthy fantasies and ‘what if’ scenarios What Is Meant by the Stage of Formal Operations?
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Chapter 15 Compare the responses of Julor, Jenny, and Alan to the hypothetical question, “What if people had no thumbs?” Which of these children has reached Piaget’s formal operational stage of cognitive development? On what basis did you make this decision? What is hypothetico-deductive reasoning? Do any of the children in the video use hypothetico- deductive reasoning to arrive at conclusions regarding the “no thumbs” question? Cite specific characteristics of their response that support your answer. Lessons in Observation:
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This note was uploaded on 01/06/2012 for the course TECA 1354 taught by Professor Susyamathews during the Fall '11 term at Collins.

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chapter15 - Childhood and Adolescence: Voyages in...

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