Chapter_3

Chapter_3 - CHAPTER3 Whyissocialexperiencethekeyto...

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CHAPTER 3
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Why  is social experience the key to  human personality? What  familiar social settings have  special importance to how we live and  grow? How  do our experiences change over  the life course?
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SOCIALIZATION The lifelong social experience by which people  develop their human potential and learn  culture Socialization is basic to human  development
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PERSONALITY A person's fairly consistent patterns of acting,  thinking, and feeling Built by internalizing our surroundings Humans need social experience to learn  their culture and to survive
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Human Development: Nature And  Nurture Humans depend on others to provide care  needed Physical growth Personality development
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The Biological Sciences: The Role of  Nature Charles Darwin Human behavior was instinctive – our “nature” U.S. Economic System reflects “instinctive human  competitiveness” People are “born criminals” Women are “naturally” emotional and men are  “naturally” more rational
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People trying to understand cultural  diversity also misunderstood Darwin European explorers linked cultural  differences to biology Viewed members of less technological  societies as less evolved – “less human” Ethnocentric view helped colonization
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The Social Sciences: The Role of  Nurture John B. Watson (1878-1958) Behaviorism Held that behavior is not instinctive but learned People are equally human, just culturally  different Human behavior is rooted in nurture not nature
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Social scientists are cautious about  describing  any  human behavior as  instinctive Human life depends on the functioning of  the body Whether you develop your inherited  potential depends on how you are raised Nurture matters more in shaping human  behavior Nurture is our nature
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Social Isolation Ethically, researchers cannot place human  in total isolation to study what happens Studied rhesus monkeys Found that complete isolation for even six  months seriously disturbed development Unable to interact with others in a group Confirmed the importance of adults in cradling  infants Isolation caused irreversible emotional and  behavioral damage
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What new understanding of the familiar  ad campaign “Have you hugged your  child today?” do you gain from the  Harlow research?
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This note was uploaded on 01/06/2012 for the course SOC 1301 taught by Professor Emekaohagi during the Fall '11 term at Collins.

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Chapter_3 - CHAPTER3 Whyissocialexperiencethekeyto...

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