Chapter_4

Chapter_4 - CHAPTER 4 How do we create reality in our face-to-face interactions Why do employers try to control their workers feelings on the job

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CHAPTER 4
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How do we create reality in our face-to-face interactions? Why do employers try to control their workers’ feelings on the job as well as their behavior? What makes something funny?
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SOCIAL STRUCTURE: A GUIDE TO EVERYDAY LIVING SOCIAL INTERACTION The process by which people act and react in relation to others STATUS A social position that a person holds Generally refers to “prestige” STATUS SET All the statuses a person holds at a given time Changes over life
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Ascribed and Achieved Status Ascribed Status A social position a person receives at birth or takes involuntarily later in life Matters about which we have little choice Achieved Status A social position a person takes on voluntarily that reflects a personal ability and effort People’s ascribed statuses influence the statuses they achieve
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Make a list of ten important statuses in your life. Indicate whether one is ascribed or achieved. Is this difficult to do? Explain your answer.
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Master Status A status that has special importance for social identity, often shaping a person’s entire life Can be negative as well as positive Gender is a master status because all societies limit opportunities for women Physical disability can serve as a master status
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Role Behavior expected of someone who holds a particular status A person holds a status and performs a role Varies by culture In every society, actual role performance varies according to a person’s unique personality Some societies permit more individual expression than others
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Role Set A number of roles attached to a single status Differs by society May or may not be important to social identity
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Role Conflict and Role Strain Role Conflict Conflict among the roles connected to two or more statuses Role Strain Tension among the roles connected to a single status
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Role Exit The process by which people disengage from important social roles The process of becoming an “ex” Process begins as people come to doubt their ability to continue in a certain role “Exes” carry with them a self-image shaped by an earlier role “Exes” must also rebuild relationships with people who knew them in their earlier life
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The Social Construction of Reality “Inevitably we construct ourselves. Let me explain. I enter this house and immediately I become what I have to become, what I can become: I construct myself. That is, I present myself to you in a form suitable to the relationship I wish to achieve with you. And, of course, you do the same with me.” (Pirandello, L. (1917). The pleasure of honesty. 1962: 157-58)
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Social Construction of Reality The process by which people creatively shape reality through social interaction Idea is the foundation of the symbolic-interaction approach “Reality” remains unclear in everyone’s minds Especially in unfamiliar situations Social interaction is a complex negotiation that builds reality Perception of events are based on different interests and intentions
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This note was uploaded on 01/06/2012 for the course SOC 1301 taught by Professor Emekaohagi during the Fall '11 term at Collins.

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Chapter_4 - CHAPTER 4 How do we create reality in our face-to-face interactions Why do employers try to control their workers feelings on the job

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