Chapter 6 Bone and Skeletal Tissue part 1

Chapter 6 Bone and Skeletal Tissue part 1 - Chapter6...

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Chapter 6 Bones and Skeletal Tissue Angela Peterson-Ford, PhD [email protected]
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6 Bones and Skeletal Tissues Part 1
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Skeletal Cartilage Contains no blood vessels or nerves Surrounded by the perichondrium (dense  irregular connective tissue) that resists outward  expansion Three types – hyaline, elastic, and fibrocartilage
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Hyaline Cartilage Provides support, flexibility, and resilience Is the most abundant skeletal cartilage Is present in these cartilages: Articular – covers the ends of long bones Costal – connects the ribs to the sternum Respiratory – makes up the larynx and reinforces air  passages Nasal – supports the nose
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Elastic Cartilage Similar to hyaline cartilage but contains elastic  fibers Found in the external ear and the epiglottis
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Fibrocartilage Highly compressed with great tensile strength Contains collagen fibers Found in menisci of the knee and in  intervertebral discs
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Growth of Cartilage Appositional – cells in the perichondrium secrete  matrix against the external face of existing  cartilage Interstitial – lacunae-bound chondrocytes inside  the cartilage divide and secrete new matrix,  expanding the cartilage from within Calcification of cartilage occurs During normal bone growth During old age
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Bones and Cartilages of the Human  Body Figure 6.1
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Classification of Bones Axial skeleton – bones of the skull, vertebral  column, and rib cage Appendicular skeleton – bones of the upper and  lower limbs, shoulder, and hip
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Classification of Bones: By Shape Long bones –  longer than they  are wide  (e.g., humerus) Figure 6.2a
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This note was uploaded on 01/06/2012 for the course BIOL 2401 taught by Professor Elainefanin during the Spring '11 term at Collins.

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Chapter 6 Bone and Skeletal Tissue part 1 - Chapter6...

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