Chapter 8 Joint (Articulations) part 2

Chapter 8 Joint - Chapter8 Joints(Articulations AngelaPetersonFord,PhD Part2 apetersonford@collin.edu Planejoints Articularsurfaces

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Chapter 8  Joints  (Articulations) Part 2 Angela Peterson-Ford, PhD apetersonford@collin.edu
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Plane joints Articular surfaces  are essentially flat Allow only slipping  or gliding  movements Only examples of  nonaxial joints Types of Synovial Joints Figure 8.7a
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Hinge joints Cylindrical projections of one bone fits into a trough-shaped  surface on another Motion is along a single plane Uniaxial joints permit flexion and extension only Examples: elbow and interphalangeal joints Types of Synovial Joints
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Types of Synovial Joints Figure 8.7b
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Rounded end of one bone protrudes into a “sleeve,”  or ring, composed of bone (and possibly ligaments)  of another Only uniaxial movement allowed Examples: joint between the axis and the dens, and  the proximal radioulnar joint Pivot Joints
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Pivot Joints Figure 8.7c
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Oval articular surface of one bone fits into a  complementary depression in another Both articular surfaces are oval Biaxial joints permit all angular motions Examples: radiocarpal (wrist) joints, and  metacarpophalangeal (knuckle) joints Condyloid, or Ellipsoidal, Joints
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Condyloid, or Ellipsoidal, Joints Figure 8.7d
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Similar to condyloid joints but allow greater  movement Each articular surface has both a concave and a  convex surface Example: carpometacarpal joint of the thumb Saddle Joints
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Saddle Joints Figure 8.7e
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A spherical or hemispherical head of one bone  articulates with a cuplike socket of another Multiaxial joints permit the most freely moving  synovial joints Examples: shoulder and hip joints Ball-and-Socket Joints
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Ball-and-Socket Joints Figure 8.7f
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Largest and most complex joint of the body Allows flexion, extension, and some rotation Three joints in one surrounded by a single joint  cavity Femoropatellar Lateral and medial tibiofemoral joints Synovial Joints: Knee
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This note was uploaded on 01/06/2012 for the course BIOL 2401 taught by Professor Elainefanin during the Spring '11 term at Collins.

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Chapter 8 Joint - Chapter8 Joints(Articulations AngelaPetersonFord,PhD Part2 apetersonford@collin.edu Planejoints Articularsurfaces

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