MATH 1342 CHAPTER 5 HANDOUT

MATH 1342 CHAPTER 5 HANDOUT - CHAPTER 5 SUMMARY Probability...

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CHAPTER 5 SUMMARY Probability Rules: Probability of an Outcome A (or Event A) – denoted as P(A) – is the likelihood that A will occur. Sample Space is the set of all possible outcomes. The probability of an event that could not possibly occur is 0 and the probability that an event will certainly occur is 1. So for any probability 0 ≤ P(a) ≤ 1. The sum of the probabilities of all possible outcomes in the sample space is 1. Two methods of finding a probability of an event: Empirical (or Experimental) – ( ) ( ) Frequency A P A n = where n is the number of trials. Classical – #_ _ _ _ _ ( ) #_ _ _ _ of ways A can occur P A of all possible outcomes = . The empirical method is an estimate of the true probability which is the determined with the classical method. Law of Large Numbers – As the number of trials (n) increases P(A) from the empirical method approaches the P(A) of the classical method. Mutually Exclusive Events and the Addition Rule and Compliments:
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This note was uploaded on 01/07/2012 for the course MATH 1342 taught by Professor Lisajuliano during the Fall '12 term at Collins.

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MATH 1342 CHAPTER 5 HANDOUT - CHAPTER 5 SUMMARY Probability...

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