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ENGL 1301 PowerPoint 15 Argument

ENGL 1301 PowerPoint 15 Argument - Argument ENGL 1301...

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ENGL 1301 Argument
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Essay grounded on reasoning and logical, structured evidence that attempts to convince reader to accept an opinion persuade reader to take some action or both Argumentative Essay
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Personal Preference or Taste Facts Argument only occurs when there is room for disagreement Some Topics Are NOT Arguable
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Reasons are key points or general ideas to defend thesis, or main argument Reasons must often be substantiated by evidence Present reasons and evidence in such a way that reasonable readers will likely agree or at least see position as plausible Rational Appeal: Logos
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Common ground = assumptions: humans have certain rights the public good is a “good” scientific facts are true reason matters May have to spell out assumptions May have to define terms to make clear upon what grounds you are arguing Without common ground, there’s no real point Common Ground/Assumptions
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Facts that no one can seriously dispute: Historical facts Scientific facts Geographical facts Facts aren’t arguable themselves, but they do provide strong backup for argumentative propositions: Some established truths basically amount to enlightened common sense every person has a unique combination of Types of Evidence: Established Truths
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An authority is a recognized expert in some field Only use authoritative opinions! Indicate credentials to your readers Beware of extremely biased opinions Because authorities don’t always agree, their views lack the finality of established truths Their opinions will only convince if the audience accepts the authority as authoritative Types of Evidence: Opinions of Authorities
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Documents or other materials produced by individuals directly involved with the issue
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