ENGL 1301 PowerPoint 16 Writing an Informative Research Paper

ENGL 1301 PowerPoint 16 Writing an Informative Research Paper

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Writing A Research Paper ENGL 1301
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Topic Focus Explore—Research!/Orient Yourself Sort out available information
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Topics to Avoid Topics based entirely on personal experience or opinion Topics fully explained in a single source Topics that are brand new Topics that are overly broad Topics that have been worked over and over
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From Topic, to Issue, to Claim Use brainstorming to narrow down the topic and create an issue Issue = Question Avoid simple issues/issues that can be easily answered by a single source Come up with a tentative claim—a hypothesis Test and refine hypothesis as you research Having claim will prevent you from being overwhelmed by the information of the
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Claims for Different Purposes Try to Establish Something as a Fact— most likely point of your informative research paper Defend or oppose some policy Support or oppose some action Assert the greater value of someone or something Often deductive as you show how conclusions follow from agreed-upon values
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Directing Essay to Readers Need to know: How much does audience know about this issue? What are readers’ interests, expectations, and needs concerning this issue? What evidence is most likely to inform them? What objections and consequences would probably weigh most heavily with
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Research: Using Sources The best and most reliable sources are old-fashioned print media (often now in electronic form but initially in print form) If you restrict yourself to electronic sources like the Internet, you do yourself a disservice
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Evaluating Sources Most reputable sources: 1. Books published by academic and university presses 2. Articles in scholarly and professional journals 3. Articles in prominent and reputable newspapers
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Questions on Sources Is the information recent? If not, is the validity of the information likely to have changed? How credible is the author? Is he/she an expert on the subject? Does the information seem sound, fair, thoughtful? Is the evidence reliable?
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Evaluating Web Sources Restrict yourself to web sources: Signed by an Author Hosted by a Respectable Site, University Library Official Association devoted to the topic Also ask: Does it explain how the data was
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ENGL 1301 PowerPoint 16 Writing an Informative Research Paper

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