acft_run_length

acft_run_length - Aircraft Runway Length Estimation (Part...

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Virginia Tech 1 of 59 Aircraft Runway Length Estimation (Part 1) Dr. AntonioA. Trani Associate Professor Department of Civil Engineering Virginia Tech
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Virginia Tech 2 of 59 Organization of this Section Understanding basic aircraft weights and its limits General Equations of Motion to Understand Runway Length Curves and Tables General Federal Aviation Regulation Criteria to Develop Runway Length Requirements at Airports General Methods to Estimate Runway Length at Airports
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Virginia Tech 3 of 59 Understanding Aircraft Weights and its Limits
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Virginia Tech 4 of 59 Aircraft Mass Definitions There are several important aircraft operational characteristics to know about the aircraft mass Aircraft mass expenditures are significant and thus need to be accounted for in the air vehicle runway length analysis. - OEW = operating empty weight (or mass) is the weight (or mass) of the aircraft without fuel and payload (just the pilots and empty seats) - MTOW = maximum takeoff operating weight (or mass) - structurally the maximum demonstrated mass at takeoff for safe flight - MALW = maximum allowable landing weight (or mass) is the maximum demonstrated landing weight (or mass) to keep the landing gear intact at maximum sink rate (vertical speed)
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Virginia Tech 5 of 59 Aircraft Mass Definitions (II) - MSPW = maximum structural payload weight (or mass) is the maximum demonstrated payload to be carried without stressing the aircraft fuselage - MZFW = maximum zero fuel weight (or mass) is the sum of the OEW and the MSPW - MTW = maximum taxi weight (or mass) of the maximum demonstrated weight (or mass) for ground maneuvering. Usually slightly more than MTOW All aircraft operating weight limits are established during the certification of the vehicle (FAR part 25 - for transport aircraft or FAR 23 for smaller aircraft)
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Virginia Tech 6 of 59 Operational Definitions DTW = desired takeoff weight (or mass) is the weight of the aircraft considering fuel (includes reserve), payload and OEW to complete a given stage length (trip distance) where: is the payload carried (passengers and cargo) is the operating empty weight is the fuel weight to be carried (usually includes reserve fuel) DTW PYL OEW FW + + =
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Virginia Tech 7 of 59 Runway Length Estimation Procedures Factors influencing runway length performance Performance requirements imposed by FAR regulations (such as FAR 25, 23, 121, 91, etc.) Environmental characteristics (temperature and pressure) of the airport in question Operating limits on aircraft weight Methods to calculate runway length AC 150/5325-4 (tables and graphs) Use of aircraft manufacturer data (such as Boeing data) Declared distance concept (AC 150/5300-13 Appendix 14)
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Virginia Tech 8 of 59 General Equations of Motion to Understand Runway Length Curves and Tables
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Virginia Tech 9 of 59 Introductory Remarks on Aircraft Performance Air vehicles are significant different than their ground vehicle counterparts in three aspects: Aircraft require a prepared surface to lift-off and fly which
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This note was uploaded on 01/07/2012 for the course CEE 4674 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Virginia Tech.

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acft_run_length - Aircraft Runway Length Estimation (Part...

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