structureorganization213-page1

- organs This is evident in the cellular structure and organization of plants and repeated over and over in the development of shoot and flower

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Plant Structure and Organization - 1 In our first unit of Biology 213 we will focus on the structure and function of the “higher” plants, in particular the angiosperms, or flowering plants. We will look at how plants “solve” the many “problems” of life in ways that are similar to and in ways that are different from the animals with which you are now familiar. It may be helpful at first to review some of the characteristics of life from the context of how plants approach life and living. Principles of Plant Biology Structure and Support Living organisms have an organized structure, and exhibit increasing levels of complexity from molecules, to cells and tissues, to integrated systems of
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Unformatted text preview: organs. This is evident in the cellular structure and organization of plants and repeated over and over in the development of shoot and flower buds and root primordia. Energy Needs Living organisms require energy to survive. Virtually all plants do photosynthesis, providing their own chemical energy, which is then stored as carbohydrate fuel. All living organisms are dependent on this photosynthetic product for their energy source. Plants must do cellular respiration, the process that converts the fuel molecules to the energy needed to do cell work, just as all organisms must. These chemical pathways are virtually the same in all organisms....
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This note was uploaded on 01/08/2012 for the course BIO 213 taught by Professor Makina during the Fall '09 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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