aimenathan_Hist122_ResearchPaper

aimenathan_Hist122_ResearchPaper - Vincent van Gogh's...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Vincent van Gogh's Self-Mutilation Nathan Aime HIST122 Western Civilization since the Thirty Years’ War Professor Robert Busek 21 March 2011
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Vincent van Gogh is one of the most well-known figures in the history of art and has always been a fascinating artist. Van Gough, overtime, has caught the attention and respect of many artists, critics and ordinary fans. When Van Gough started to symbolize his personal thoughts about the individuals he was painting, he was able to start expressionism, which was a new style of painting. Comparable to some artists, he went through many variations of style and subject matter concerning his work, due to much dissatisfaction he had suffered in his life countless times. A gift that not many artists are blessed with in their lives, it is quite interesting to actually see the changes that occurred in his life through his work. Although, Vincent van Gogh was an artistic mastermind, he was very insecure throughout his whole life: led by tragic mental health and physical conditions, as well as many family enigmas, and a love life of dilemmas. A life led by tragic mental health and physical conditions, van Gogh’s life seemed rather lonely and very depressive. The loneliness and isolation were mostly lead from intense mental and emotional states that were very unpredictable, which hindered van Gogh from reaching the acknowledgement and success he should have been shown during his lifetime. His self-portraits reflected his inner pain, usually a depiction from the various mood changes he would have due to his mental illness, which in turn would influence the expressions he would use on his face or the color schemes used in the self-portraits he painted. “I thought that there had been nothing wrong with me, but afterward I felt that I had been ill. Well, there are moments when I am twisted by enthusiasm or madness or prophecy, like a Greek oracle on the tripod.” 1 Creating ongoing memories of his persistent sadness as well as his phenomenal talent, van Gogh transferred his sorrow and pain to the viewer through his self-portraits. His 1889-90 self-portrait with Bandaged 1Nathalie Heinich, Glory of Van Gogh: An Anthropology of Admiration (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1996), 77.
Background image of page 2
Ear is defiantly one of the portraits that stand out as evidence of the physical effects of illness on van Gogh's. The story behind the bandaged ear portrait truly shows the crazy motifs behind his paintings. “On Christmas Eve, 1888, in the small Provençal town of Arles, the police found a young Dutch émigré painter in his bed bleeding from the head, self-bandaged and semi- ́ conscious, in a run-down residence called, for its peeling exterior, the Yellow House.” 2 The stories vary about what the true trigger was behind van Gogh’s ear incident. Was it caused from an altercation from one of his friend Paul Gauguin, whom he shared the Yellow House with? Was it due to van Gogh finding out about his younger brother Theo’s engagement? Theo wrote about
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/08/2012 for the course BUSN 310 taught by Professor Alex during the Spring '11 term at American Public University.

Page1 / 9

aimenathan_Hist122_ResearchPaper - Vincent van Gogh's...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online