Ch4 - Chapter 4 Requirements Engineering Lecture 1 Chapter...

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Chapter 4 – Requirements Engineering Lecture 1 1 Chapter 4 Requirements
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Topics covered Functional and non-functional requirements The software requirements document Requirements specification Requirements engineering processes Requirements elicitation and analysis Requirements validation Requirements management 2 Chapter 4 Requirements
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Requirements engineering The process of establishing the services that the customer requires from a system and the constraints under which it operates and is developed. The requirements themselves are the descriptions of the system services and constraints that are generated during the requirements engineering process. 3 Chapter 4 Requirements
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What is a requirement? It may range from a high-level abstract statement of a service or of a system constraint to a detailed mathematical functional specification. This is inevitable as requirements may serve a dual function May be the basis for a bid for a contract - therefore must be open to interpretation; May be the basis for the contract itself - therefore must be defined in detail; Both these statements may be called 4 Chapter 4 Requirements
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Requirements abstraction (Davis) “If a company wishes to let a contract for a large software development project, it must define its needs in a sufficiently abstract way that a solution is not pre-defined. The requirements must be written so that several contractors can bid for the contract, offering, perhaps, different ways of meeting the client organization’s needs. Once a contract has been awarded, the contractor must write a system definition for the client in more detail so that the client understands and can validate what the software will do. Both of these documents may be called the requirements document for the system.” 5 Chapter 4 Requirements
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Types of requirement User requirements Statements in natural language plus diagrams of the services the system provides and its operational constraints. Written for customers. System requirements A structured document setting out detailed descriptions of the system’s functions, services and operational constraints. Defines what should be implemented so may be part of a contract between client and contractor. 6 Chapter 4 Requirements
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User and system requirements 7 Chapter 4 Requirements
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Readers of different types of requirements specification 8 Chapter 4 Requirements
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Functional and non-functional requirements Functional requirements Statements of services the system should provide, how the system should react to particular inputs and how the system should behave in particular situations. May state what the system should not do.
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This note was uploaded on 01/09/2012 for the course EMP EMP5117 taught by Professor Bohehm during the Fall '11 term at University of Ottawa.

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Ch4 - Chapter 4 Requirements Engineering Lecture 1 Chapter...

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