Session1 - Introduction to Project Management Session 1...

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    1 of 61 Introduction to Project  Management Session 1 James Bowen, Ph.D, PMP
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2 of 60 AGENDA Class goals Course Outline Background Teaching style Speakers, videos, etc. Notes Text book  Grading and assignments Contest  Groups Objectives Generally accepted practices Projects Project Management Project Life Cycles Stakeholders Summary Assignment 1 Discussion
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3 of 60 Forces 3 Paramount Forces driving Project Management: 1.  The exponential expansion of human knowledge 2.  The growing demand for a broad range of complex,       sophisticated, customized goods and services 3. The evolution of worldwide competitive markets for  the       production and consumption of goods and services All 3 forces combine to mandate the use of teams to solve  problems that used to be solvable by individuals
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4 of 60 Question Traits associated with being an  effective project manager?
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5 of 60 Project? “A project is a complex, non-routine, one-time effort limited by time, budget, resources and performance specifications designed to meet customer needs”
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6 of 60 What is a project? A project is a temporary endeavor undertaken to create  a unique product or service  A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge  (PMBOK™), Project Management Institute, 1999  One time  Limited funds/time  Specific resources utilized  Performed by people - Single or multi-person team  Planned, controlled  Specific Deliverables  Unique - similar, new  Progressive elaboration
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7 of 60 Major Characteristics of a  Project 1. Defined Life Span (a beginning and an end) 2. Unique in nature – Tend have risk 3. High degree of corporate focus 4. Interdependencies 5. Uniqueness 6. Conflict
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8 of 60 Introduction Examples of projects Split the atom Chunnel between England and France Introduce Windows XP “Projects, rather than repetitive tasks, are now  the basis for most value-added in business” -Tom Peters
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9 of 60 What is a Project? Project Take place outside the  process world Unique and separate  from normal  organization work Process Ongoing, day-to-day  activities Use existing systems,  properties, and  capabilities
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10 of 60 Comparison of Routine Work  with Projects TABLE 1.1 Routine, Repetitive Work   Taking class notes    Daily entering sales receipts into  the accounting ledger   Responding to a supply-chain  request    Practicing scales on the piano  Routine manufacture of an Apple  iPod Attaching tags on a  Projects Writing a term paper    Setting up a sales kiosk for a  professional accounting  meeting Developing a supply-chain  information system    Writing a new piano piece Designing an iPod that is  approximately 2 X 4 inches,  interfaces with PC, and stores 
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This note was uploaded on 01/09/2012 for the course ADM 6260 taught by Professor Bowen during the Winter '11 term at University of Ottawa.

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Session1 - Introduction to Project Management Session 1...

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