06-Routing - The Fundamentals of Routing EE122 Fall 2011...

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1 The Fundamentals of Routing EE122 Fall 2011 Scott Shenker http://inst.eecs.berkeley.edu/~ee122/ Materials with thanks to Jennifer Rexford, Ion Stoica, Vern Paxson and other colleagues at Princeton and UC Berkeley
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Announcements • 194 is set up: 4 units: CCN: 25571 – Everyone should be off wait list by now…. – Waiting for more accounts o Send me email if you need one…. – Will set up bspace for 194 to hand in homework • Open today with questions about project 1 • Hope you all handed in HW1 – HW2 out on Wednesday • Survey will be available after Wednesday’s class 2
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Questions about Project 1 (for Shaddi) 3
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Warning…. • This lecture contains detailed calculations • Prolonged exposure may induce drowsiness • Do not operate heavy machinery while listening 4
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Where Are We? • Motivated our basic design decisions – Best-effort, packet-switching, blah, blah, blah • Last lecture: how to build reliable transport on top • This lecture: how to build the network itself • Basic Task: deliver packets – Need to route them, from anywhere to anywhere Today, we focus on routing 5
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The Traditional Routing Curriculum • Learning switches • Link-state routing – Dijkstra’s Algorithm • Distance-vector routing – Bellman-Ford 6
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I have some bad news…. . • Don’t have anything interesting to say about routing • Will follow standard curriculum – Much of it covered in the text But will focus more on principles than details • Will work through two algorithms, but details may wait until Wednesday…. . 134 slides! – Let’s just see how timing goes – If you don’t want to be bored, ask questions! 7
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Remember…. • Goal of the first portion of course is conceptual • Ignore real networks • Think about the basic concepts • That’s where we are. Later will deal with reality… 8
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9 Basics of Routing and Forwarding
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Addressing (at a conceptual level) • Assume all hosts have unique IDs • No particular structure to those IDs • Later in course will talk about real IP addressing 10
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Packets (at a conceptual level) • Assume packet headers contain: – Source ID, Destination ID, and perhaps other information 11 Destination Identifier Source Identifier Payload Why include this?
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Switches/Routers • Multiple ports (attached to other switches or hosts) • Ports are typically duplex (incoming and outgoing) 12 incoming links outgoing links Switch
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Example of Network Graph 13 Six ports, incoming/outgoing Four ports, incoming/outgoing
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A Variety of Networks • ISPs: carriers – Backbone – Edge – Border (to other ISPs) • Enterprises: companies, universities – Core – Edge – Border (to outside) • Datacenters: massive collections of machines – Top-of-Rack – Aggregation and Core – Border (to outside) 14
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UUNET’s North American Network 15
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Level3’s American Network 16
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Enterprise Network 17
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Partial Datacenter Network 18
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Switches • Enterprise/Edge: typically 24 to 48 ports • Aggregation switches: 192 ports or more • Backbone: typically fewer ports • Border: typically very few ports 19
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This note was uploaded on 01/09/2012 for the course ELECTRICAL 122 taught by Professor Shenker during the Spring '11 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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06-Routing - The Fundamentals of Routing EE122 Fall 2011...

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