WS2F11-key - Worksheet #2 EE122 Fall 2011 You are not...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Worksheet #2 EE122 Fall 2011 You are not required to do these problems, and we are not asking you to hand them in. However, if you can’t do these problems, then you will have trouble on the final. In fact, many of these questions came from last year’s final. As the saying goes, “Know This”.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 1. Basic Concepts and Terms Consider the following concepts and terms: Autonomous Systems, Bellman-Ford, Congestion Control, Count-to-Infinity, Cryptographic Hash, Digital Signature, Dijkstra’s Algorithm, Duplicate Acknowledgements, End-to-End Principle, Fate Sharing, Flow Control, Hidden Terminal, Peer-to- Peer, Poisoned Reverse, Policy Oscillations, Priority Packet Scheduling, Slow Start, Public Key Cryptography, Symmetric Key Cryptography, Three-Way Handshake. Match these terms to the descriptions, using each term exactly once . (a) A design style that involves many equivalent nodes, rather than a few specialized servers. Peer- to-Peer (b) Something that can happen in BGP that results in unstable routing tables. Policy Oscilations (c) The problem in wireless networking of a sender not being able to detect if its transmissions will collide with those of another node because the sender cannot itself hear the other node’s transmissions, even though the receiver can. Hidden Terminal (d) A technique in distance-vector routing that prevents some cases of looping by not allowing a node A to advertise a route to node B if A would forward packets to node B as the first hop of that route. Poisoned Reverse (e) If the technique in item (d) above is not applied, this phenomenon can occur, which then requires many iterations of the routing protocol before a routing loop is removed. Count-to-Infinity (f) The mechanism used by TCP to open up the congestion window quickly, and is used only if the connection is not operating in Congestion Avoidance. Slow Start (g) A class of encryption algorithms that require use of a shared secret key. Symmetric Key Cryptography (h) A class of encryption algorithms that allow a host to make an encryption key widely known while remaining the only entity that can decrypt messages encrypted with this key. Public Key Cryptography (i) The mechanism used by TCP to reliably establish a connection. Three-Way Handshake (j) The entities that BGP provides routes between; BGP describes its paths in terms of a series of these. Autonomous Systems (k) A cryptographic primitive that ensures that the particular piece of data did come from a particular source (or equivalently, prevents a source from repudiating that it sent that message). Digital Signature
Background image of page 2
3 (l) A cryptographic primitive that allows the receiver to conclude that the message (or file) was not tampered with in transit. Cryptographic Hash (m) One of the basic principles of the Internet architecture, which suggests keeping functionality out of the network unless necessary. End-to-End Principle
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/09/2012 for the course ELECTRICAL 122 taught by Professor Shenker during the Spring '11 term at University of California, Berkeley.

Page1 / 19

WS2F11-key - Worksheet #2 EE122 Fall 2011 You are not...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online