22-COGS11-Musicophilia

22-COGS11-Musicophilia - Music and the Brain Robyn Elyse...

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Robyn Elyse Sablove Cogs 11: Minds and Brains IA W10 rsablove@ucsd.edu Music and the Brain
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How/WHY IS music signifcant? Birds use songs in order to attract a mate. – Singing in order to attract a mate is hardwired into their nervous system. However, a bird’s song is not. Do humans use music in order to attract mates? – From a biological sense, no. – No, you do not need to know how to play the guitar or be able to sing in order to attract a partner. – THERE IS NO “MUSIC CENTER” OF THE HUMAN BRAIN! Then why is music part of every culture? It reproduces emotions. The auditory and nervous systems are tuned for music. – But why does this occur when we don’t biologically need it? Who knows?
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Musicophilia as discussed by Oliver Sacks • “The powers of music through the individual experiences of patients, musicians, and everyday people.” • We will be discussing some interesting cases in which people have been affected through music. Intro: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZLS4Gs ogpE
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Sudden Musicophilia • Tony Cicoria, 42, Orthopedic Surgeon • Was at a family gathering when a storm began to ensue. • He went to pay phone to make a phone call. • The phone was struck by lightening and the electricity shot out of the phone and into Tony’s face.
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• He had an out-of-body experience and watched himself as he received CPR from the woman who was in line waiting for the phone. • His life “flashed” in front of him and he felt extremely content. He saw a bluish- white light. • He awoke from this feeling, he knew this because he could feel the pain and burning from the incident. • He went to the hospital and they said that he had went into brief cardiac arrest.
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• After, he felt sluggish and would forget people’s names. Yet, after an EEG and MRI, nothing seemed to be wrong. • Eventually his memory problems disappeared and he had regained his energy. • Then, he suddenly longed for playing the piano, an instrument he had not played for 30 years! When he played at the age of 12, he was indifferent to it. • He began to buy lots of recordings and wanted to learn to play them. • He ordered sheet music and began to teach himself. • Then he would hear music in his head. He would wake up in the middle of the night to write it down.
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• He began to think the only reason he survived from the lightening was due to the music. • He was obsessed, he bought every book about near death experiences and lightening. • He began to take piano lessons and later
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This note was uploaded on 01/10/2012 for the course COGN cogs 11 taught by Professor Maryboyle during the Spring '11 term at UCSD.

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22-COGS11-Musicophilia - Music and the Brain Robyn Elyse...

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