AIAA-2004-6870-790 - AIAA 2004-6870 USAF Developmental Test...

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AIAA 2004-6870 This material is a work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. † Senior Research Engineer, AFRL/VAAC, [email protected] * Assistant Professor, [email protected] # Aerospace Mechanics Division, (937) 229-2986 @ Graduate Student, AFIT American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Rapid Technology Focused Experimental and Computational Aerodynamic Investigation of a Strike Tanker Charles Tyler, Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/VAAC) Mark F. Reeder, Air Force Institute of Technology * William Braisted & James Higgins, University of Dayton Research Institute # Lt. David Gebbie, Air Force Institute of Technology @ ABSTRACT The Air Force Research Laboratory Air Vehicle Directorate (AFRL/VA) is optimizing the integration of test article fabrication, wind tunnel testing, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. One stage of the project included a coordinated effort between AFRL/VA, the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI), and the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT). A rapid prototype design methodology was developed and used to construct a stainless steel model of a strike tanker design with a blended wing-body shape. The model is a scaled version of a design provided for testing by an industrial air framer. The experimental portion of the program has been initiated in the AFIT low speed wind tunnel while the initial computational results have been processed by AFRL/VAAC. These initial results are composed of force and moment coefficient measurements for the test article for varied airspeed and angle of attack. The test article was designed to incorporate the wind tunnel balance and surface pressure measurements while maintaining a reasonable stiffness to mitigate aeroelastic effects. The experimentally measured and computationally predicted lift slopes and drag coefficients generally correspond well for many conditions. However, the most compelling preliminary result is that of an experimentally observed stall at angles of attack approaching 20 degrees, whereas no stall was found in the initial CFD model. INTRODUCTION In order to characterize and improve aircraft designs, it is imperative to quickly assess their aerodynamics. Traditionally, this has been accomplished by test article fabrication, wind tunnel testing, and prediction of performance using scale-up rules. The challenges inherent to the accomplishment of this goal have often resulted in lengthy time requirements. In the past few decades, technological advancements have enabled faster and more accurate assessment in three specific areas: 1) rapid prototyping, 2) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling, and 3) global measurements. The primary goal of this study is to develop a process by which each of these three modern, rapid-technology assessment techniques may be incorporated in a complimentary fashion. This effort was undertaken using a specific
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This note was uploaded on 01/10/2012 for the course AFGC-UF 4001 taught by Professor Fielding during the Spring '11 term at Hawaii Pacific.

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AIAA-2004-6870-790 - AIAA 2004-6870 USAF Developmental Test...

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