runway_calculations_addition1

runway_calculations_addition1 - Dr. Antonio A. Trani...

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CEE 4674 – Airport Planning and Design (copyright A. Trani) 1 Dr. Antonio A. Trani Professor of Civil Engineering Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University January 27, 2009 Blacksburg, Virginia
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CEE 4674 – Airport Planning and Design (copyright A. Trani) 2 Runway Design Assumptions (FAA 150/5325-4b) Applicable to approaches and takeoff without consideration to obstructions outside the airport (these will come later) No wind conditions Zero runway gradient Dry runway conditions
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CEE 4674 – Airport Planning and Design (copyright A. Trani) Critical Design Aircraft A listing of aircraft or an individual aircraft that requires the longest runway length Federal funding requirements imply the critical aircraft should be used at least for 250 landings and 250 takeoffs (or 500 itinerant operations) Weight categories used in airport runway length design: Small airplane (MTOW < 12,500 lb or < 5,670 kg) Large airplane (MTOW > 12,500 lb or > 5,670 kg) Aircraft with MTOW < 60,000 lb or < 27,273 kg Regional jets Commercial Airliners 3
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CEE 4674 – Airport Planning and Design (copyright A. Trani) 4 Steps in the Runway Length Procedure (5 steps) 1. Identify the list of potential critical airplanes 2. Identify the weights of the critical aircraft and associated with weights – If the aircraft MTOW < 60,000 then the method used is based on a “Family Grouping of Airplanes” – If the aircraft MTOW >= 60,000 then the method used is based on an ”Individual analysis” – Regional Jets use the second method even if the weigh < 60,000 lb 3. Use Table 1-1 and the critical aircraft in step 2 to decide on he recommended method for runway length required
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CEE 4674 – Airport Planning and Design (copyright A. Trani) 5 Steps in the Runway Length Procedure (5 steps) Source: FAA 150/5325-4b
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CEE 4674 – Airport Planning and Design (copyright A. Trani) 6 Steps in the Runway Length Procedure (5 steps) 4. Select the recommended runway length from various runway lengths generated in step # 3 5. Apply adjustments to the runway length obtained in step # 4 Runway gradient Wet pavement conditions
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CEE 4674 – Airport Planning and Design (copyright A. Trani) Definition of Primary Runway Most airports require only one primary runway Primary runways are designed and oriented so that 95% of the time the design crosswind components are not exceeded (more later in the course) However, sometimes multiple primary runways are needed for: – Capacity reasons – To accommodate forecasted growth – To mitigate noise impacts Design objective for additional primary runways is contained in Table 1-2 7
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CEE 4674 – Airport Planning and Design (copyright A. Trani) Table 1-2 in FAA AC 150/5325-4b 8
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CEE 4674 – Airport Planning and Design (copyright A. Trani) Table 1-3 in FAA AC 150/5325-4b 9
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CEE 4674 – Airport Planning and Design (copyright A. Trani) Runway Length Based on Declared Distance Concept New runways are expected to be designed according to the principles of Tables 1-1 and 1-2
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This note was uploaded on 01/07/2012 for the course CEE 4674 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Virginia Tech.

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runway_calculations_addition1 - Dr. Antonio A. Trani...

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