runway_orientation

runway_orientation - Airport Runway Location and...

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Virginia Tech 1 of 24 Airport Runway Location and Orientation CEE 4674 Airport Planning and Design Dr. Antonio A. Trani Associate Professor of Civil Engineering Virginia Tech
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Virginia Tech 2 of 24 Runway Location Considerations The following factors should be considered in locating and orienting a runway: Wind Airspace availability Environmental factors (noise, air and water quality) Obstructions to navigation Air traffic control visibility Wildlife hazards Read Chapter 2 of FAA AC/150-5300-13 for more information about each topic
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Virginia Tech 3 of 24 Runway Orientation and Wind The orientation of the runway is an important consideration in airport planning and design The goal of this exercise is to define the runway orientation that maximizes the possible use of the runway throughout the year accounting for a wide variety of wind conditions FAA and ICAO regulations establish rules about runway orientation and their expected coverage Ideally, all aircraft operations on a runway should be conducted against the wind Unfortunately, wind conditions vary from hour to hour thus requiring a careful examination of prevailing wind conditions at the airport site
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Virginia Tech 4 of 24 Cross Wind Operations All aircraft have maximum demonstrated cross wind components (usually specified in the flight manual) Runway Wind vector Aircraft Velocity Vector Resulting Aircraft Ground Speed Vector Crosswind Component Wind vector
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Virginia Tech 5 of 24 Demonstrated Wind Conditions Each aircraft has a uniquely stated maximum crosswind component (derived from flight test experiments) A Boeing 727-200 (approach group C) has a maximum
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This note was uploaded on 01/07/2012 for the course CEE 4674 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Virginia Tech.

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runway_orientation - Airport Runway Location and...

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