The Commodification of Culture

The Commodification of Culture - TheCommodificationofCulture

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Commodification of Culture Material culture –  Includes the tangible and visible artifacts, implements, and  structures created by people. Nonmaterial culture –  Is not tangible and is associated with oral traditions and  behavioral practices. Cultural geography –  Is a branch of human geography that emphasizes human beliefs  and activities. Commodification –  The conversion of an object, a concept, or a procedure once not  available for purchase into a good or service that can be bought or sold. Consumption –  Broadly defined, the use of goods to satisfy human needs and desires. Cartel –  Entity consisting of individuals or businesses that control the production or sale  of a commodity or group of commodities – often worldwide. Conflict diamonds –  Diamonds sold to finance wars or terrorist activities. Haka –  A collective ritual dance. Maori -  Heritage industry –  Enterprises such as museums, monuments, and historical and  archaeological sites that manage or market the past. Heritage
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 3

The Commodification of Culture - TheCommodificationofCulture

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online