chap1 - CHAPTER 1 Principles of Life(An Introduction to...

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CHAPTER 1 Principles of Life (An Introduction to Life on Earth)
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BIOLOGY Greek BIO = life LOGIA = study of
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Biology—the scientific study of living things “Living things”—All the diverse organisms descended from a single- celled ancestor (a single common ancestor )
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Define - “LIFE” Dictionary - “the condition which distinguishes animals & plants from inorganic objects & dead organisms” Dead (Dictionary) = “deprived of life”
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Scientific Principles Natural Causality - all events can be traced to natural causes Uniformity in Time & Space - forces (natural laws) acting today are the same as those of past Common Perception - all humans perceive natural events in the same way (senses)
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Scientific Principles 1 Scientific Principles Underlie All Scientific Inquiry 1 Natural Causality Is the Principle That All Events Can Be Traced to Natural Causes 2 The Natural Laws That Govern Events Apply Everywhere and for All Time 3 Scientific Inquiry Is Based on the Assumption That People Perceive Natural Events in Similar Ways 2 The Scientific Method Is the Basis for Scientific Inquiry 3 Science Is a Human Endeavor
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Common Perception does not mean or result in Common Interpretation. Interpretation is influenced by external factors, such as, the cultural, social, and philosophical background of the observer(s). Science focuses on quantifiable measures NOT abstract value systems.
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Life’s Levels of Organization We understand life by thinking about nature at different levels of organization Nature’s organization begins at the level of atoms, and extends through the biosphere The quality of life emerges at the level of the cell
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A Pattern in Life’s Organization Atoms Fundamental building blocks of all substances Molecules Consisting of two or more atoms Cell The smallest unit of life Organism An individual consisting of one or more cells
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A Pattern in Life’s Organization Population Individuals of the same species in the same area Community Populations of all species in the same area Ecosystem A community and its environment Biosphere All regions of the Earth where organisms live
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Levels of Organization in Nature
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Levels of Organization in Nature
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Key Concepts Living Organisms Share Common Aspects of Structure, Function, and Energy Flow Genetic Systems Control the Flow, Exchange, Storage, and Use of Information Organisms Interact with and Affect Their Environments Evolution Explains Both the Unity and Diversity of Life Science Is Based on Quantifiable Observations and Experiments
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1. Complexity & Organization Structural and Functional 2. Homeostasis Maintain a relatively constant internal environment while external environment varies 3. Acquire & Use Matter & Energy Metabolism 4. Growth 5. Respond to Stimuli Light, touch, hunger 6. Reproduction DNA 7. Capacity to Evolve As a population
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This note was uploaded on 01/09/2012 for the course BIO 160 taught by Professor Howardhaemmerle during the Winter '12 term at Bellevue College.

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chap1 - CHAPTER 1 Principles of Life(An Introduction to...

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