chap17 - Speciation Chapter 17 EVOLUTION EVOLUTION IS THE...

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Speciation Speciation Chapter 17
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EVOLUTION EVOLUTION EVOLUTION IS THE GENETIC CHANGE  OCCURRING IN A  POPULATION  OF  ORGANISMS OVER TIME Changes in the gene pool (allele frequency) of a  species from one generation to the next as a  consequence of such processes as natural  selection, genetic drift, and mutation. Chapter 17 2
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Species Species All the populations of an  organism that are  potentially capable of  interbreeding under  natural conditions to  produce fertile offspring  that are consistently and  persistently distinct and  recognizable.  Species  are reproductively  isolated from each other. Chapter 17 3 Canis lupus
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Population Population Defined as a group of individuals of  the same species, located within a  specific area that actually or  potentially interbreed with each  other. Chapter 17 4
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Speciation Speciation Def. - the process where two  populations become reproductively  isolated from each other. Speciation depends on the isolation  and genetic divergence of the two  populations. Chapter 17 5
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Natural Selection Natural Selection Natural selection Differential survival and reproduction among individuals  of a population that vary in details of shared, inherited  traits Adaptive trait Any trait that enhances an individual’s  fitness  (ability  to survive and reproduce in a particular environment) Chapter 17 6
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In biology,  subspecies, race and breed  are  equivalent terms.  Breed  is usually applied to  domestic animals;  species and subspecies , to wild  animals and to plants; and  race , to humans.  Colloquial use of the term  dog breed , however, does not conform to  scientific standards of taxonomic classification. Breeds do not meet  the criteria for subspecies since they are all considered a subspecies  of the gray wolf, an interbreeding group of individuals who pass on  characteristic traits and would likely merge back into a single  homogeneous group if external barriers were removed. Dog breeds  are groups of closely related and  visibly similar domestic dogs, which are all of the  subspecies  Canis lupus familiaris , having  characteristic traits that are selected and maintained  by humans, bred from a known foundation stock. Chapter 17 7
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Canis lupus subspecies Canis lupus familiaris Chapter 17 8
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Essentials of Evolutionary  Essentials of Evolutionary  Theory Theory 1. Natural populations of all organisms have the  potential to produce far more offspring than are  required to replace parents.
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chap17 - Speciation Chapter 17 EVOLUTION EVOLUTION IS THE...

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