Ocean101-Ch15-Envir

Ocean101-Ch15-Envir - No! And remember. If you're not part...

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1 No! And remember… If you’re not part of the solution, you’re part of the precipitate Water Polluters: Top Violators Statewide Foggy day in Puget Sound (one of ~165 per year) From http: //seattlepi .nwsource nwsource .com/specials/sound/ Who’s Permitted to Pollute From http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/specials/sound/
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2 Fig. 15.26, p. 366 Non-Point-Source Pollution Non-Point-Source Pollution Intentional or unintentional Whether realize it or not Awareness, education, legislation Mostly runoff from storm drains May also be dumped from ships or from land Trash, plastics, oil, heavy metals, sediments, fertilizers, etc! Marine Environmental Concerns Marine Environmental Concerns Rachel Carson Rachel Carson ’s 1962 book, s 1962 book, Silent Spring Silent Spring , is credited with starting the environmental movement in the United States. The book exposed the damaging effects that synthetic pesticides have on ecosystems. Today we are faced with multiple sources of marine pollution and related environmental damage. Our willingness and ability to control our damaging actions will determine the future of the oceans, will determine the future of the oceans, and the quality of life of future generations. Marine Environmental Concerns Marine Environmental Concerns Marine Pollution Oil (Petrochemicals) Heavy Metals Synthetic Organic Chemicals Sewage and Eutrophication Solid Wastes (such as plastics) Excess Sediments Other Marine Concerns Waste Heat Introduced (Invasive) Species Ozone Depletion and Global Warming “What Can I Do? What Can I Do?
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3 Marine Pollution Marine pollution Marine pollution refers to the introduction of damaging materials into the oceans by human activities ( any harmful anthropogenic substance). Pollutants change the quality of the water, and/or affect the functioning of individual organisms, populations, or ecosystems (coastal ocean, open ocean). The majority of marine pollution comes from LAND in the form of runoff , discharges , or airborne emissions airborne emissions . Fig. 15.27, p. 367 Characteristics of a Pollutant Characteristics of a Pollutant Concepts important for characterizing a pollutant: Quantity - the amount of a particular pollutant present. Toxicity - the amount of a pollutant required to cause a certain amount or type of damage. Persistence - the length of time a pollutant lasts in an environment. Some pollutants may eventually disappear because they are biodegradable , meaning they can be broken down by natural processes into simpler and less-damaging (?) compounds. Levels of Biological Response to Pollution Levels of Biological Response to Pollution Biochemical-cellular – Minutes to hours Organism – Hours to months Population dynamics – Months to decades Community dynamics and structure – Years to decades
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4 Oil Pollution Oil Pollution A certain amount of crude oil has naturally escaped into the oceans throughout geologic time. But human activities have vastly increased the amount.
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Ocean101-Ch15-Envir - No! And remember. If you're not part...

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