eng_119 - r i : St. Jerome’s University in the University...

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Unformatted text preview: r i : St. Jerome’s University in the University of Waterloo Department of English English 119 (001 , 002) — Fall 2011: Communications in Mathematics and Computer Science Course Outline Instructor: Mark Spielmacher E-maii: msspielm@uwaterloo.ca Office Hours: Monday, 10:30—12:20 in STJ 1017 Lecture: Section 001: Monday, 9:30-10:20 in STJ 1036 Section 002: Monday, 12130-1 :20 in STJ 1036 Tutorial: you are required to attend afl of your scheduled tutorial workshops, beginning in the first week. Attend only your scheduled tutorial section. Your TUT section: Your TUT inslmclor: TUT instructor's e-mail'. TUT inslnictor’s office! hours: Course Description: This course is designed to give you instruction and practice in the oral and written forms of communication that you as a Math andlor Computer Science student wilt need in the academic environment and in the workplace. Much of the work that you do this term will rely on your co—operation as a member of a team. It is crucial that you attend both the lectures and the workshops regularly, and participate in teamwork that may take place outside of class time. Learning Objectives: By the end of the term you will have gained the confidence in your own ability to conduct research and complete a variety of projects; you will also have a portfolio of sample written documents to show potential employers. in addition, you will acquire confidence in working as part of a team, communicating, practicing professional behaviour, and making oral presentations. Please note: this is not an English language course. it is strongly recommended that you achieve the English Language Proficiency Exam (ELPE) milestone before taking this course. If English is your second language, you will need to demonstrate a high level of competence in English in order to succeed in this course. _‘_——-—-__~i @guired Text: Alred, Brusaw and Oiiu, Handbook of Technical Writin ‘3th ed. Bedford/St. Martin’s. /;a (Please no e: e on s ore may ave copies 0 0th the 9 edition orthe 9 “rewsédreditionj’ you may purchase either edition.) Class Schedule: A detailed class schedule is attached to this outline. Consult it regularly, as it contains a list of lecture topics, required reading, workshop activities, and due dates for assignments and other workshop requirements. Please note that you are reguired to bring your textbook to ail workshops, and attendance in all of the workshops is mandatory. Assignments! Marking Scheme: 1. Professionalism and Participation (10%). This grade will be based on attendance, participation, and professional conduct in the lectures and workshops. Students are expected to attend all lectures and workshops, complete all in-class written exercises and group work, and behave in a professional manner at ail times (as you would in a workplace environment). Arriving late generally disrupts classroom activities; Iatecomers will therefore be penalized unless a valid excuse is provided in writing. Chronic lateness will affect your grade, as will unexplained and unwarranted absence. 2. ResumeiCover letter assignment (10%). Based on guidelines provided in the lecture and tutorial workshop, and using information that will be provided on UW—ACE, you will revise a resume and compose a cover letter for an imaginary student. Full assignment guidelines will be made available on UW—ACE. .5 3. Processllnstructional Document (10%). Students will begin this assignment in the workshop and complete it outside of class. It will involve the critical analysis and/or revision of an instructional document for an imaginary device. 4.Team Research Project (70%). Project topics will be made available on October 3'”. The end product of this project will be formal research report and presentation, along with any additional products your team feels are suitable (for example, a print document or Web site). Your intended audience must be someone in the Faculty of Mathematics. The report will also have relevance to multiple “stakeholders,” whom you will determine in the course of your work. All information relevant to this project will be made available on UW—ACE. All team members are required to participate in the research, analysis, design and composition of the report, and to play an active role in the design and delivery of the presentation, which will take place in the last week of the term. Time will be allotted during the workshops for team meetings, but you will find it necessary to hold team meetings outside of class, as well. All students are required to act as team coordinator for one week, to report on the team’s progress, to bring drafts of work as required, to attend all team meetings, and to act in a professional manner — just as you would in an employment setting. Students who do not participate fully in the teamwork for this project may forfeit some or all of the individual and team grades for the project. This major project is broken down into several assignments: a) Project Proposal (5% shared grade). As a team, design a workable proposal for the team project. Guidelines for designing an effective proposal will be covered in a lecture. b) ProgressIStatus Report (10%, individual grade). Each student will act as team coordinator for at least one week. At the end of this period, the team coordinator will present an oral status report (5 minutes) at the end of the workshop, to be followed by a formally written e- mail (not an e—mail attachment) to the instructor within 48 hours. c) Research Update (10%, individual grade). This will be an in-class writing assignment. Each team member will be responsible for bringing two academic research sources, related to the team project, to the workshop, and be prepared to answer specific questions related to the sources. Students should be prepared to compare and contrast the research articles. Guidelines to assist you in finding appropriate sources will be available on UW~ACE. Please note that this assignment is considered the same as a midterm or test: students who do not attend to write this assignment will receive a grade of 0. YOu will also be graded on the quality of both your responses and your expression, and marks will be deducted for significant writing errors. Be prepared! d) Formal Research Report (5% shared grade, 15% individual grade). Each team member will write an identifiable sub—section of the discussion section of the report (750 words each). The remainder of the report should be team written. Project guidelines will be made available on UW—ACE. e) Formal Team Oral Presentation (5% shared grade, 15% individual grade). Each team member must present a clearly-defined section of the presentation. Guidelines will be made available. f) Project, Team, and Self-Evaluation (5% individual grade). Upon completion of the team project, each team member will submit by email an assessment of the experience, which will consist of paragraphs on each of the following: an evaluation of each team member’s contributions to the project, a self evaluation, and an assessment of the project as a whole. W Course Policies: Late papers will be penalized 2% per weekday late. Often students have legitimate reasons for requesting an extension; in such a case the student should take the opportunity to compose a f0rmal and polite e-mail to the workshop instructor, outlining the reasons for the request and providing a rationale for a new due date. This e—mail should be sent at least 24 hours in advanca of the due date. Please note that there will be no extensions for the team report. Correspondence: Students using e-mail to contact any instructor must include their first and last names, student number, and course in which they are enrolled in the e—mail subject line. E—mails composed in English 119 must be formally and professionally written. Avoidance of Academic Offences: Academic Integrity: In order to maintain a cuiture of academic integrity, members of the University of Waterloo community and its Federated University and Affiliated Colleges are expected to promote honesty, trust, fairness, respect, and responsibility. Discipline: All students registered in courses at St. Jerome’s University are expected to know what constitutes academic integrity, to avoid committing academic offences, and to take responsibility for their actions. Students who are unsure whether an action constitutes an offence, or who need help in learning how to avoid offences (e.g., plagiarism, cheating) or about “rules” for group work/collaboration should seek guidance from the course professor, academic advisor, or the Associate Dean. For information on categories of offences and types of penalties, students should refer to Policy #71, Student Academic Discipline, www.adm.uwaterloo.ca/infosec/Poiicieslgolicy?‘i .htm Grievance: A student who believes that a decision affecting some aspect of his/her university life has been unfair or unreasonable may have grounds for initiating a grievance. In such a case, contact the St. Jerome’s University Grievance Officer. Read St. Jerome’s University Handbook, Section 4, item 8, www.siu.calfaculty/SJU handbook/grievance golicyhtml. Appeals: A student may appeal the finding and/or penalty in a decision made under ST. Jerome’s University Academic Discipline Procedure or Grievance Policy if a ground for an appeal can be established. in such a case, contact the St. Jerome’s University Appeals Officer. Read St. Jerome’s University Handbook, Section 6.4, www.siu.calfacultylSJU handbook/examinations grades standings and aggealshtml. Academic integrity website (Arts): Further information on “How to Avoid Plagian’sm and Other Written Offences: A Guide for Students and Instructors” can be found at wwwarts.uwaterloo.calartslugrad/academic resgonsibilityhtml. Office of Academic integrity (UM: httg:l/uwaterloo.calacademicintegriyl Note for students with disabilities: The Office for Persons with Disabilities (OPD), tocated in Needles Hall, Room 1132, collaborates with all academic departments to arrange appropriate accommodations for students with disabilities without compromising the academic integrity of the curriculum. If you require academic accommodations to lessen the impact of your disability, please register with the CPU at the beginning of each academic term. Thursda . do ndi n on our schedule Sept 12: o organizing information Course intI’OduCtion “diagnostic” writing exercise Sept 19: pp. 471ff, resumes and cover letters (continued) Job skilis (Interviews, resumes and 35ft, 272fi bring a copy of your resume cover letters) begin the resumelcover letter assignment in the workshop Sept 26: communicating instructions clearly Designing and Writing Instructional process assignment begins in the workshop Manuals resumelcover letter assignment due Oct 3: pp. 102tf. e-mail communication exercise o workplace communication (e-mail) 162ff, 72 case study work: team and topic selection, first team o requirements of the team project meeting - do not miss this workshop 0 working as a team 0 process assignment due o research skills Oct 10: 0 “problem solving in teams" exercise Thanksgiving — University closed (no a writing proposals 19m?” 9. but note that WOMShOP - team meeting: project proposal work tutorials are still scheduled!) Oct 17: pp. 459ff, a project proposal draft due for editing - progress reports 398ff o [first team coordinator oral progress report] P - oral resentation skills Oct 24: p. 129ff, paraphrase practice - assessing the validity of research 347ff, team meeting a other research skills 455“ team proposal is due in the workshop - effective writing strategies [team coordinator oral progress report] Oct 31: a few common writing errors - common problems in writing in-class assignment: research update and o guidelines for the research update comparison—each team member must have two assignment academic articles (printed) forthis assignment a [team coordinator oral progress report] Nov 7: pp. 195ff, o team meeting: examination of sample reports o analysis and incorporating research 281 if a [team coordinator oral progress report] findings into your discussion Nov 14: pp. 529- a draft copies of individual report sections are c report organization 30, 181, required for editing (copy editing and proof reading) o focusing on the reader‘s needs 519. 276. 0 team meeting 93, 34 0 [team coordinator oral progress report] Nov 21: pp. 391ff final report editing a presenting research as a team presentation design o designing presentations team meeting [final team coordinator progress report] Nov 28: Team Presentations o effective and ineffective o note: project, team, and self evaluations are due presentation styles within 48 hours of the presentations Dec 5: o concluding lecture team reports due in the lecture ...
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This note was uploaded on 01/10/2012 for the course MATH 164667 taught by Professor John during the Spring '10 term at Al-Quds Open University.

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eng_119 - r i : St. Jerome’s University in the University...

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