Political Geography 1

Political Geography 1 - Political Geography Where are...

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Political Geography
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Where are states located? State: an area organized into a political unit and ruled by an established government that has control over its internal and foreign affairs (synonym: country) Antarctica is only large landmass that is not part of a state; legal framework for managing Antarctica was established in Treaty of Antarctica
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Korea Former colony of Japan Divided into 2 occupation zones by US and USSR after Japan’s defeat in WWII Both Korean governments are committed to reuniting the country into 1 1992 both Koreas were admitted into UN as sep. countries
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China and Taiwan According to China, Taiwan is not a sep. state, but is part of China Up until 1999, Taiwan agreed After 1940s civil war in China, losing nationalist leaders fled to Taiwan and proclaimed they were still legitimate leaders of entire country of China Most other governments consider the two as sep. countries
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Western Sahara (Sahrawi Republic) Considered by most African countries to be sovereign state Morocco controls the territory UN is sponsoring referendum for residents of Western Sahara to decide if they want independence or want to continue to be part of Morocco
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Varying Size of States Largest: Russia (17.1 million sq. km/ 6.6 million sq. miles) 5 others with more than 2 mill. Sq miles (China, Canada, US, Brazil, Australia) Smallest: microstates; smallest in the UN is Monaco (.6 sq miles); many are islands, which explains small size and sovereignty
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Development of the State Concept Prior to 1800s, Earth organized into city-states, empires, tribes… but concept of independent states is new-ish Movement to divide world into states came from Europe; but development of states comes from Fertile Crescent City-state: sovereign state that comprises a town and surrounding countryside
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Colonies Territory that is legally tied to a sovereign state rather than being completely independent European countries came to control much of the world this way God, gold, glory Britain, France, Portugal, Spain, Germany, Italy, Denmark, Netherlands, Belgium
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Colonial Practices Varied from country to country France tried to assimilate colonies into French culture British created different governments structures/policies for various territories (helped protect various cultures) Most colonies in Asia and Africa became independent after WWII Only a handful remain; almost all in Pacific Ocean or Caribbean Most populous: Puerto Rico Least populous: Pitcairn Island
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Where Are Boundaries Drawn Between States? Boundaries result from natural features (rivers, mountains…) and cultural features (language, religion…) Boundaries commonly create conflict, both within a country and with its neighbors
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Affects the potential for communication and conflict with neighbor Can influence the ease/difficulty of internal administration Can affect social unity
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This note was uploaded on 01/11/2012 for the course HUMAN GEOG 1 taught by Professor Rich during the Spring '11 term at Belmont.

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Political Geography 1 - Political Geography Where are...

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