Chapter Iv -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Colonialist domain the whole Europe from 17 century to 18’s, trades the  large quantities of black Africans to the Americas as slaveries, they were  forced labour, suffered all kinds of torture. During work time, black slaveries  often sing a mournful elegy to express their painful feelings and the  aspirations for their hometown and family.   Slave work songs were created in the African tradition of call-and-response.  To tell a story, a song leader would call out a line and then the workers  would respond to the call. Because many slaveholders did not allow the  slaves to speak to each other, so the only way they could communicate was  the song. They developed many different ways of getting their secret  messages across in the lyrics.  
Background image of page 2
Slaves also sang soulful songs called "spirituals".   (Defined as a song which expresses religious  beliefs, feelings and desire for freedom).
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
With the intense golden rush happen in America, in  the mid to late 1800s, America was thought of as  "the land of opportunity.” many people( especially  European) immigrated to America's cities seeking  their fortunes in the New World. 
Background image of page 4
JAZZ began in New Orleans, because New Orleans is the most  cosmopolitan city in nineteenth century in America, where the  marching bands, Italian opera, Caribbean rhythms, and minstrel  shows filled the streets with a various and gorgeous music.  During this period, African-American musicians created a new  music out of these ingredients by mixing this overseas music and  the soulful feeling of the blues. People are calling it jazz. This is  how Jazz formed. The Entertainer
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
As people (mostly African Americans) migrated to northern cities like  Chicago and New York to seek better opportunities, they brought with to  these big cities as well. At this time, many young Americans were  depressed and disheartened by the bad influence of WWI and they began  to challenge the old fashioned to their parents.  So, listen and dance the high-spirited jazz became part of their habit.  Especially young women, known as the famous "flappers," which  shocked their parents by cutting their hair and wearing shorter dresses.  Also, because the 1920s was a time of economic growth rapidly, people  had extra money to spend on entertainment and amusement. Radios and  record players became a popular stuff in family. Through Radios and  record players brought Jazz to America's airwaves, dancing halls, night  club and living rooms. 
Background image of page 6
In 1929, America enters a decade of economic desperation, as the Stock  Market collapses and the Great Depression begins. Factories fall silent, 
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 17

Chapter Iv -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online