ee4215_c1 - Content Overview/security Basis Birth of...

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Content Overview/security Basis Birth of Computer Security Ways to secure Password Secrets Ways to Threaten Computer Security Security Violations Ways to prevent computer crimes Business Continuity Pest Programs Your Personal Data Network Security
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Security System Human Tech- nology Law Overview
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Security Basis C . I . A . Triad C onfidentiality I ntegrity A vailability
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1.1 The Birth of Computer Security Data Security requirements The Network Criminal Hackers Hacker’s Prey Employee Passwords
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1.1.1 Data Security Decentralized networks lend data vulnerable to intentional destruction, alteration, theft, and espionage.
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1.1.2 The Network Criminal The people who attack the vulnerability of data systems possess significant computer expertise and/or have access to sensitive data .
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1.1.3 Hackers Most computer system intruders are not teenagers. Instead, most hackers are competitors who are stealing proprietary or sensitive government information.
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1.1.4 Hackers’ Prey Hackers begin by persuading unsuspecting people to give away their passwords or security information over the phone. Employees should be alerted to such scams.
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1.1.5 Employee Passwords Employees use passwords to work on computer systems. Employers expect these passwords to be kept secret from others.
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1.2 Ways to Secure Password Secrets Avoid common name mix-n-match characters store passwords wisely change password often avoid hackers scams
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1.2.1 Avoid Common Names Common names associated with you are naturally easy for you to remember, but they are easily cracked.
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1.2.2 Mix-n-Match Characters Make your password a mix of: letters and numbers upper and lower case alphabetic and non-alphabetic characters not2hard JUST4u Han$on
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1.2.3 Store Passwords Wisely Keep your password in your head or in a safe, not in an obvious location.
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1.2.4 Change Password Often Changing your password should become a habit so that you lessen the chance of it becoming known to intruders.
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1.2.5 Avoid Hacker Scams In these scams, the hacker poses as a person to whom you can confide your password. Regardless of the ruse, the wise user will not give their password to anyone. This action is called “social engineering”.
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1.3 Ways to Threaten Computer Security Computer Crime Credit Card Fraud Data Communication Fraud Unauthorized Access Unlawful Copying
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Computer Crime Computer crime includes: Credit card fraud Data communications fraud Unauthorized access Unlawful copying
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Credit Card Fraud Credit card customer numbers pass between public and private networks. Sometimes these numbers are captured by computer criminals and used to commit fraud.
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Data Communications Fraud This form of fraud involves the interception of network passwords or packets of data passing through networks.
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