PracticeExam4

PracticeExam4 - Practice Exam IV AST101 Fall 2011 1 Note:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Practice Exam IV AST101 Fall 2011 1 Note: the final exam covers all of the material covered in class, but this practice exam covers only the material since mid-term 3. Please use the previous practice exams, mid-terms and Lecture Tutorials as additional practice questions for the final. Choose the best answer from those provided. All questions are worth 1 point. 1. The nebular theory predicts that a cloud that gives birth to planets should have the shape of a spinning disk. Which observable property of our solar system supports this prediction? (a) All the planets orbit the Sun in the same direction and in nearly the same plane. (b) There are two basic types of planets: terrestrial and Jovian. (c) The four largest planets all have disk-shaped ring systems around them. (d) The orbit of Earth’s Moon lies very close to the ecliptic plane. 2. What do we conclude if a planet has few impact craters of any size? (a) The planet was never bombarded by asteroids or comets. (b) Its atmosphere stopped impactors of all sizes. (c) Other geological processes have wiped out craters. 3. The solar system has two types of planets, terrestrial and Jovian. According to the nebular theory, why did terrestrial planets form in the inner solar system and Jovian planets in the outer solar system? (a) Ices condensed only in the outer solar system, where some icy planetesimal grew large enough to attract gas from the nebula, while only metal and rock condensed in the inner solar system, making terrestrial planets. (b) After the planets formed, the Sun’s gravity pulled the dense terrestrial planets inward, leaving only Jovian planets in the outer solar system. (c) Denser particles of rock and metal sank into the inner solar system, leaving only gases in the outer solar system....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 01/11/2012 for the course AST 101 taught by Professor Rosenzweig during the Fall '08 term at Syracuse.

Page1 / 6

PracticeExam4 - Practice Exam IV AST101 Fall 2011 1 Note:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online