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Lecture+19.Contemporary+Immigration

Lecture+19.Contemporary+Immigration - Lecture 20...

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Lecture 20. Contemporary Immigration Issues Reminder: No class next Monday. Extra credit assignment due Wednesday, 11/23, 12 pm.
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Outline change in immigration laws and “browning” of America discussion of Farmingville and politics of immigration do punitive measures against undocumented work?
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1921-1965 Period of Restriction 1921 and 1924 immigration laws: each country has different quota; favors northern and western Europeans little change during this period 1943: end of Chinese Exclusion, because China is ally of US in WWII; but still very small quota
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Revival of Immigration Since 1965
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1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, aka Hart-Cellar new preference scheme 1. unmarried children of US citizens 2. unmarried children of legal resident aliens 3. artists, scientists, professionals of unusual ability 4. married children of US citizens 5. siblings of US citizen 6. skilled and unskilled workers in short supply 7. refugees new quotas 170,000 for eastern hemisphere 120,000 for western hemisphere 20,000 for each country (equal rather than unequal quotas) key exception to quotas: spouses, children, parents
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Growth of Hispanic Population 3.6 4.8 6.9 9.7 13.2 16.4 19.3 22.5 0 5 10 15 20 25 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030
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Why Immigration So Heavily Non- European Since 1965? Europe: more developed, less need to immigrate family reunification: not many Euro immigrant groups needed it skilled visas: India, Korea, Philippines, etc.
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